Barry Bonds

Bonds Trial Update: ex-friends and garbled recordings

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Taking the stand in the Bonds trial yesterday was Steven Hoskins, a childhood friend of Barry Bonds who grew up to be something of a fixer and lackey.  Hoskins would pay Bonds’ bills, make sure his baseball equipment was in order and pay off Bonds’ girlfriends with a wad of cash he kept in a safe in his office. You know, the usual stuff.

The real reason for his testimony, however, was for one of the things he did that wasn’t part of his job description: he secretly recorded Bonds’ steroids dealer so that he could either (a) play the tape to Bonds’ dying father in an effort to dissuade Bonds from continuing to use drugs; or (b) blackmail Bonds so that Bonds wouldn’t pursue charges against Hoskins after he found out that Hoskins had been forging Bonds’ name on baseball memorabilia and contracts and stuff.

Of course, whether it’s (a) or (b) depends on whether you’re a prosecutor or a defense lawyer.

The tape was played in court yesterday, and as we’ve previously noted, its contents are probably only damaging if one already believes the overall narrative that Bonds knew what he was taking. That’s because it contains no mention of Bonds’ knowledge of anything, only Greg Anderson’s admission that they were, in fact, undetectable illicit drugs. The tape will bolster the view of those who think Bonds lied via other evidence that comes in, but it will do nothing to convince someone that Bonds lied, it seems.

Hoskins was subjected to some pretty withering cross-examination on his reasons for making the tape, which occurred after he and Bonds had their falling out over the memorabilia sales.  Bonds had already gone to the government at that point and had asked that Hoskins be investigated. It was the strong implication of Bonds lawyer Allen Ruby that Hoskins made the tape to have something to use against Bonds, either to get back at him for going to the feds or to prevent him from pursuing the charges.  The investigation was eventually dropped. Ruby contends that it was done so in exchange for Hoskins helping the government in its case against Bonds.

Judging on reports from the courtoom — which, granted, aren’t always ideal — the cross examination of Hoskins seemed pretty damaging. Bonds’ lawyers had Hoskins testy and confused at times. He mixed up dates. He contradicted previous statements he had made out of court in which he said he’d seen Bonds get injected with drugs (yesterday he only said that he saw Anderson enter Bonds bedroom with syringes).  To the extent that the jury buys Hoskins as a shifty guy trying to make money off Bonds, they may very well question his reasons for making the tape, buying in to the blackmail notion Ruby was trying to plant.

There was one exchange — passed along by Gwen Knapp of the Chronicle — that struck me: Ruby asks Hoskins if he ever threatened Bonds.  Hoskins said no. Ruby said “You sure about that?”  Hoskins was defiant in his denial. Then he asked to take a break, which the judge agreed to.

We were taught to never ask a witness if they’re sure about their answer unless we had stone-cold evidence that we could burn them later. Because if not, you as the lawyer look desperate and you end up making the witness look more credible.  If you have something that later shows the witness to have been incomplete or something less than truthful in his answer, however, it can be devastating.

Ruby doesn’t strike me as a desperate or sloppy lawyer. Hoskins’ cross-examination continues today. I’m eager to see if Hoskins is truly sure about his answer.

It’s spring training for groundskeepers too

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Or, I should say, it’s spring training for whatever automated timer thingie turns the sprinklers on and off.

This was the scene at Goodyear on Saturday as the Indians and Reds played in the bottom of the eighth in their spring training opener. Reds manager Bryan Price says that this was probably the second or third time this has happened in the middle of a game there.

Maybe investigate manually operating that bad boy? Just a suggestion!

The Chicago Cubs: Spring training games, regular season prices

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Craig Calcaterra
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MESA, AZ — I’ve been covering spring training for eight years, and in just those eight years a lot has changed in the Cactus and Grapefruit League experiences. The parks are bigger and fancier and the vibe is far more akin to a regular season major league one than the intimate and laid back atmosphere most people think of when they picture February and March baseball.

Just imagine, however, how much has changed if you’ve been coming to Florida or Arizona for a really long time.

“When we first started coming, you could bring your own beer in,” says Don Harper, a lifelong Cubs fan from Kennewick, Washington who spends his winters in Arizona. “You couldn’t bring a cooler, but you could bring a case of beer and a bag of ice and you just set it down in between you and you just put the ice on it and keep it cold.”

I asked Don if the beer vendors complained.

“They didn’t sell beer,” he said.

That was three decades and two ballparks ago. They certainly sell beer at the Cubs’ gleaming new facility, Sloan Park. Cups of the stuff cost more than a couple of cases did back when Don first started coming to spring training.

The price of beer is not the only thing that has changed, of course. The price of tickets is not what it used to be either. Don told me that when he started coming to Cubs spring training games tickets ran about seven dollars. If that. It’s a bit pricer now. Face value for a single lawn ticket, where you’ll be sitting on a blanker on the outfield berm — can be as high as $47 depending on the day of the week and the opponent. Infield box seats run as high as $85.

The thing is, though, you’re not getting face value seats for Cubs spring training games. Half of the home games sold out within a week of tickets going on sale in January. Since then just about every other game has sold out or soon will. That will force you to get tickets on the secondary market. According to TickPick, the average — average! — Cubs spring training ticket on the secondary market is $106.30. For a single ticket. It’s easily the highest price for spring training tickets in all of baseball, and is $26 higher than secondary market tickets for the next highest team, the Red Sox:

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That may be shocking or even appalling to some, but as the automatic sellouts at Sloan Park and those high secondary market prices suggest, there are at least 15,000 people or so for each Cubs home game who don’t seem to mind. Supply meet demand meet the defending World Series champions.

I spoke with two younger Cubs fans, Corey Hayden and Eleanor Meloul, who traveled here from Salt Lake City. On Sunday they lucked out and got a couple of lawn seats for $28. On Saturday, however, they paid $100 a piece on StubHub to get some seats just beyond third base. I asked them if there is some price point that would keep them from coming.

“There isn’t one,” Hayden said. “I paid $4,500 for a World Series ticket, so . . .”

Don Harper wouldn’t do that, but he doesn’t really mind the higher prices he’s paying for his spring tickets. Of course, he’s a longtime season ticket holder so he gets access to the face value seats. I asked him whether his spring training habit would end if those prices got jacked up higher, as the market would seem to bear, or if he had to resort to the secondary market.

Don paused and sighed, suggesting it was a tough question. As he considered it, I put a hard number on it, asking him if he’d still go if he had to pay $50 per ticket. “Yeah, probably,” he said. “$75?” I asked. He paused again.

“As long as I got enough money.”

Don is a diehard who, one senses, will always find a way to make it work. Corey spent a wad of cash on that once-in-a-lifetime World Series ticket, but he and Eleanor seem content to bargain hunt for the most part and splurge strategically. If you’re a Cubs fan — and if you’re not rich — that’s what you’ll have to do. The ticket it just too hot.