Scott Boras will be the keynote speaker at SABR convention

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I’ve attended the annual Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) convention every summer since 2004, but often skip the awards luncheon because a) it’s awfully expensive for some mediocre chicken, b) sometimes there’s an actual baseball game going on at the same time, and c) if there isn’t an actual baseball game there’s definitely some drinking to be done.

My luncheon attendance also depends a lot on the keynote speaker. Marvin Miller and Jim Bouton were must-attends for me no matter the price, but some of the others haven’t really piqued my interest.

This year’s convention is in California and not surprisingly SABR has landed a big-name keynote speaker in agent Scott Boras, so I may have to attend simply because he’s been such a frequent topic here at Hardball Talk. Maybe he’ll even take some questions, in which case I can ask about his relationship with Jon Heyman or his current take on the wonderful Oliver Perez/Sandy Koufax comparisons. Or maybe even think of a worthwhile question. It’s not until July, after all.

Incidentally, I highly recommend going to the SABR convention. If you love baseball and hanging out for a few days with other people who love baseball, it’s tough to beat.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.