Happy Barry Bonds Trial Day!

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Barry Bonds’ trial begins today. It’s expected to last a two-to-four weeks. First up on the agenda is jury selection which, I assume anyway, will take up the whole day. I love jury selection in a high profile case, by the way. It’s always fun to see the folks who say they haven’t heard a thing about a case that’s been in the news for years. I’d be curious to see polling of people who live in the Northern District of California to see just how many people truly haven’t heard about the Barry Bonds case.

But that’s our system, I suppose, and there’s not much that can be done. And at least the people in the Northern District of California aren’t likely to read the Daily News that much. Because if they do, they’d learn in the first few paragraphs that Barry Bonds is staying “in plush comfort in a suite on the 16th floor of the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco – the same sort of suite where U.S. Presidents stay when they visit the city by the bay,” which isn’t at all designed to make him seem imperious or anything.  And they’d also note that “he appears visibly smaller than he did during his playing days.” Unlike all of those other athletes who maintain a hardcore training regimen four years after they retire.

Not that the Daily News isn’t correct on its facts. For example, this fact seems closest to the truth about this prosecution than anything I’ve read in the past couple of years:

The government wants to make Bonds a felon, even if Illston’s history of BALCO sentencing makes it extremely unlikely that Bonds would see the inside of a prison cell.

Their motivation? Having spent millions prosecuting the landmark case, the government wants to close out the BALCO saga with a perfect streak of convictions that began with guilty pleas from the drug ring’s central conspirators and ended with the failed appeals of track cyclist Tammy Thomas, who was convicted in 2008 of crimes nearly identical to those Bonds is charged with committing: perjury and obstruction of justice.

Play ball.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays; Yankees land Brandon Drury

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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.