Jerry Reinsdorf talks about why the White Sox have gone “all-in”

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It’s so rare that you hear a team owner talk frankly about the big picture decisions that come with running a team. They all say they’re always trying to win. When they tear down and rebuild, they all talk about it being some inevitable process that was forced on them by the laws of Man and Nature, and that even so, the rebuilding will be brief and glorious and the team will be fun to watch as it happens. This strikes me as hooey most of the time, and an interview Jerry Reinsdorf gave to the White Sox beat guys yesterday bolsters that belief.

It’s a great read in which Reinsdorf notes that the Chisox could have gone either way this season, either letting their free agents go and packing it in or else going a bit nuts and loading up to catch Minnesota. Notably, he includes his thoughts about the profitability implications to all of that.  It’s not often that you hear a team owner admit that, yeah, gutting the roster could make the team turn a profit and that rebuilding can often be a long slog during which some bad baseball is played, but Reinsdorf was pretty frank about it.

And best of all, he dropped a rather self-aware line:

“The idea of being bad for two or three years is a horrible thought when you’re 75 years old.”

One gets the sense that super rich dudes who own big businesses — especially sports teams — think they’re going to live forever. It’s nice to see that that’s not the case for everyone.

The Rays announce “The Rays Tank.” Really.

Tampa Bay Rays
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Earlier this offseason the Rays traded away franchise player Evan Longoria. Over the weekend they traded starter Jake Odorizzi to the Twins and designated All-Star outfielder Corey Dickerson for assignment. These were clearly financially driven moves, and now the Rays sport a payroll of less than $70 million. The club’s offseason moves prompted Longoria to say that he feels sorry for Rays fans.

If you asked Rays brass, I’m sure they’d make strong statements defending all of these moves while offering evidence-light arguments that, yes, they truly are interested in fielding a competitive team in 2018. They would likely react VERY angrily to any suggestion that they are tanking this year. Teams never admit that they’re tanking.

In other news, the Rays announced a new blog:

Oh.