Few fans line up for Mets tickets. So what?


The Bergen Record reports on the first day of Mets single-game ticket sales and paints a gloomy picture:

There was no wait at all until 10:25, when a line of just eight people formed. No one camped out overnight like years past; no one spent hours waiting. And plenty of good tickets still are available, as the cliché goes. One father walked away with four tickets to the home opener. Several others bought Subway Series games.

This is outrageously shocking and, frankly, depressing. I mean, people still actually line up to buy tickets in the cold when you can purchase them from the comfort of your own home via the Internet? Who were those eight people on line? Are they aware that they didn’t need to go down to Citi Field to buy tickets? I’m actually kind of worried about them.

Seriously, though, I know that Mets attendance isn’t fabulous, but I’m not sure how a snapshot of the ticket gate on a cold and crappy weekday morning on the first day really brings that home in a meaningful way.

I don’t think there’s an organized conspiracy to paint the Mets in a bad light, but it does seem like, when there is a chance to paint the Mets in a bad light, people really want to take it.

The Milwaukee Brewers perform “The Sandlot”

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A lot of teams do funny promo videos during spring training. The Seattle Mariners have led the league in this category for years now, with their marketing and p.r. folks producing and a lot of game and sometimes hammy players starring in some excellent clips. They’re doing them again this year, if you’re curious.

The Milwaukee Brewers have hopped on the humor train in 2018, and their latest entry in this category of commercials is excellent. It’s their riff on “The Sandlot.”

The biggest difference: Smalls really could kill you in this one. Brett Phillips is a lot more jacked than the kid who played Scotty in the original was.

The Beast, however, is just as terrifying now as he was in 1993.