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Why aren’t more MLB general managers former MLB players?

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As a follow-up to Ruben Amaro Jr.’s recent four-year contract extension with the Phillies, Jayson Stark of ESPN.com has an interesting article about how only three of the 30 current general managers played in the big leagues.

Amaro is one, along with Kenny Williams of the White Sox and Billy Beane of the A’s. And together they had a total of 536 career hits. Amaro, Williams, and Beane have all had considerably more success as GMs, so why aren’t more former players getting the gig?

I think one big reason is that being a GM is about far more than just signing players and making trades. Back when Terry Ryan stepped down as GM of the Twins in late 2007 he talked about still loving the player-evaluation part of the job, but no longer wanting to have the other responsibilities that came along with it. And his replacement, Bill Smith, has focused more on those “other” aspects of being a GM while his top assistant, Rob Antony, and various other front office members take on a bigger role in player evaluation.

Minnesota is just one example, of course, but my sense is that applies to many and perhaps even most teams across MLB. When fans think of a GM they may imagine a guy making phone calls to other teams, sitting down with agents to hammer out contract details, and talking to scouts about which players they ought to target. In reality there’s a lot more “general” managing going on, and while many former big leaguers are no doubt very good at evaluating players they may not be quite as good at running the day-to-day or business side of things. Or at least not as good as the increasing number of Ivy League-educated GMs.

Obviously some GMs thrive at both aspects of the job, and it’s probably not a coincidence that Amaro and Williams both attended Stanford University and Beane was headed to Stanford prior to signing with the Mets out of high school. In many ways they’re extremely smart guys who just happen to be former players. I’m sure there are many more than three guys capable of hitting a curveball and being the face of a huge organization, but the modern GM job calls for a lot more than just deciding who to sign or trade and playing baseball at the highest level isn’t necessarily the best way to prepare for those other responsibilities.

Daniel Szew: “Landa was a leader, happy-go-lucky guy”

FORT MYERS, FL - MARCH 1:  Yorman Landa #81 of the Minnesota Twins poses for a photo during the Twins' photo day on March 1, 2016 at Hammond Stadium in Ft. Myers, Florida.  (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Twins’ right-handed pitching prospect Yorman Landa passed away in a tragic car accident on Friday night, per a team statement. According to Mike Berardino of the Pioneer Press, 22-year-old Landa was in the passenger seat of the vehicle when it struck a fallen tree.

Daniel Szew, Landa’s agent, spoke highly of the young pitcher, who was one of his first clients back in 2010. Szew acknowledged Landa for helping him expand his company, LA Sports Management, and referred to the late pitcher as a leader and his “little brother.”

Per Berardino:

He was very even-keeled,” Szew said. “That was his personality. He wasn’t wild. That’s why this is so tragic. He wasn’t a wild guy. He was a happy-go-lucky guy who took life as it came, and he was super happy — always happy.

If leadership was one facet of Landa’s personality, so was loyalty. The 22-year-old agreed to a minor league contract with the Twins on Tuesday after getting cut from the 40-man roster, fulfilling a promise to re-sign with the club despite fielding multiple offers from competing teams. The deal included an invite to spring training, and comments from his agent suggested that the right-hander was “super confident” he’d break through to the major leagues in 2017, notwithstanding a troublesome shoulder injury that hampered his progress in High-A Fort Myers during the 2016 season.

“He never wanted to leave,” Szew told Berardino. “It was the only organization he ever knew.”

Our condolences go out to Landa’s family and the Twins organization during this terrible time.

Twins’ minor league pitcher Landa dies in Venezuela

FORT MYERS, FL - MARCH 05:  Yorman Landa #81 of the Minnesota Twins makes a throw to first base during the fourth inning of a spring training game against the Baltimore Orioles at Hammond Stadium on March 5, 2016 in Fort Myers, Florida.  (Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
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MINNEAPOLIS — The Minnesota Twins say minor league pitcher Yorman Landa has died in Venezuela. He was 22.

The club said in a statement that the Twins are “deeply saddened by the heartbreaking loss.” The team did not say how he died.

Landa pitched in the 2016 season with the Fort Meyers Miracle, going 2-2 with 7 saves and a 3.24 ERA in 41 2/3 innings pitched. His career minor-league ERA was 2.66.

Landa had been on the Twins’ 40-man roster, but was dropped after the season. The organization signed him to a minor-league contract last week.

Landa was signed by the Twins in 2010 as a 16-year old from Santa Teresa, Venezuela.