Labor talks: Now baseball is just rubbing it in

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The NFL labor situation turned apocalyptic on Friday, with talks breaking off, lawsuits being filed and rhetoric being unleashed that will take months to walk back before real progress can be made.  In light of this, it’s almost as if baseball is gloating, what with it being ahead of schedule in its efforts to get a new collective bargaining agreement in place. Barry Bloom of MLB.com:

The second round of collective bargaining between officials for Major League Baseball and the Players Association will occur sometime during the next few weeks in the Phoenix area, Michael Weiner, the union’s executive director, said on Sunday morning after meeting with the Rangers.

The two sides had an amicable meeting in Florida on March 2, and Weiner said he hopes that regular sessions occur once the season begins on March 31.

“In 2006 we didn’t really get into that sort of rhythm until sometime in June,” Weiner said. “I think we’ll be able to do that sooner this time.”

Both Weiner and Bud Selig wax cautiously yet optimistically, citing that “whole range of issues” thing we’ve heard before as opposed to anyone citing one issue that looks to be a sticking point.  Indeed, the lack of a single contentious issue is probably the biggest reason we’ll get a new CBA with very little strife.

Which has me rather contemplative about Bud Selig’s legacy.  The 1994-95 work stoppage that cost us the World Series is, in my view, primarily his doing and it should be in the first paragraph of his Hall of Fame plaque that — whether we like it or not — he will almost certainly be given one day.

But at the same time, he has also presided over what has been an unprecedented era of labor peace. At least unprecedented since the days when the owners treated players like chattel and the players didn’t say much about it.  Assuming this deal gets done, the game will have gone over 20 years without a work stoppage and over 12 years since there was even any contentiousness to speak of.

Bud can’t be forgiven for the strike.  But the hard lesson he learned from it has certainly informed his approach since then. And that’s to his credit, I think.

Report: Mets showing interest in Bartolo Colon

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Last month, free agent right-hander Bartolo Colon told reporters that he’d be open to taking a minor league deal in 2018, but only if he was guaranteed a return to the Mets’ system. The 44-year-old starter is nearing the end of a 20-year career, and it makes sense that he’d want to have one last hurrah in the city where he had some of his most productive years.

Now, Twins starter Ervin Santana tells Mike Berardino of the Pioneer Press, it looks like the Mets might also be open to a reunion. It’s doubtful that Colon has all that much left in the tank, especially following a combined 7-14 record and 6.48 ERA for the Braves and Twins last year, but he’s not necessarily looking to reproduce the 15+ win, sub-4.00 ERA totals of years past.

Instead, Santana says, Colon is seeking the opportunity to win just six more games. He’ll enter the 2018 season five wins shy of the all-time record for a Latin American-born player, and is hoping to claim that title for himself before he enters retirement in 2019. Former Orioles and Expos hurler Dennis Martinez currently holds the record after clinching his 245th win back in 1998. While it took Colon a full season of starts to come up with even seven wins in 2017, he’s only one year removed from a 15-win campaign in 2016. Provided that the Mets are willing to gamble on him again, the milestone may not be that far out of reach.