Mitchell Page: 1951-2011

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ESPN analyst and former big leaguer Eduardo Perez passes along the sad news of Mitchell Page’s sudden passing.

Born Mitchell Otis Page, he played eight years in the majors — seven for the A’s and one for the Pirates, serving mostly as a designated hitter and outfielder. He retired after the 1984 season with a .266/.346/.429 career batting line, 560 career hits and 72 career home runs in 2,104 total at-bats.

Page served as a hitting coach for the Cardinals from 2002-2004 under manager Tony La Russa and had been operating as a roving minor league hitting instructor for the Nationals.

He went to the World Series with St. Louis in 2004 and played a small part in the development of modern baseball’s best hitter: Albert Pujols.

Doctors say Page died in his sleep Saturday night. He was 59 years old.

Aaron Boone interviewed for the Yankees manager job today

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MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch reports that ESPN broadcaster Aaron Boone interviewed for the Yankees’ manager job today. No word as to whether he hit a big home run.

Boone, an ESPN analyst, obviously has some history with the Yankees, but he has no coaching experience at any level. Joel Sherman of the New York Post wrote earlier this week of Boone that the Yankees “are intrigued if his charisma and passion can compensate for inexperience.” I’d say the answer to that question, whenever asked and in whatever context, is always “no,” but I suppose there’s a first time for everything.

So far the Yankees have interviewed Rob Thomson, Eric Wedge and Hensley Meulens. Yesterday Brian Cashman said there was no rush to fill the job, and that the Winter Meetings are not a deadline for the team in doing so.