The Mets had money trouble even before the Madoff lawsuit

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The Mets’ talking points have been that, were it not for the Madoff lawsuit, everything would have been hunky dory financially speaking.  The New York Times reports this morning, however, that such is not the case:

When the owners of the Mets said in late January that they would seek buyers for up to 25 percent of the club, they cited “the air of uncertainty” created by the $1 billion lawsuit brought by Irving H. Picard, the trustee representing the victims of Bernard L. Madoff’sPonzi scheme.

But a look at the team’s financial condition — gleaned from public financial documents and numerous interviews — suggests the team may well have needed the proceeds from selling part of the team regardless of the suit.

The Times says that the team realized significantly lower revenues upon moving into Citi Field than they had anticipated and that combined with (a) the overall financial downturn; and (b) less-than-stellar on-the-field performances led to the Mets seeking investors on the down low prior to the lawsuit and their public announcement that they were looking for a cash influx.

The lawsuit is there now, of course, and that certainly trumps whatever cash flow issues the Wilpons were facing before in terms of financial uncertainty. But potential investors aren’t going to be on the hook in the lawsuit. They are, however, going to depend on Mets’ cash flow in order to vindicate their investment. If it’s less rosy than we suspect, it may be harder to justify taking the plunge.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.