Tradition Field

Behold the power of spring training


Moses Green is a longtime reader (and occasional proofreader) of mine.  He’s also a Mets fan, and had the opportunity to take in a Mets spring training game there the other day.  He waxed crazy-effusive:

Quick spring training note:  visited Port St. Lucie with a buddy while driving home to CT from Miami.  Got to the Mets-Nats game there at the Mets’ facility at 11 a.m. for a 1:05 p.m. start with the car and coolers all packed.  Tailgating you say?  Why no – sunscreen and straight in to watch batting practice.

I really just wanted to give you a quick rave about the Mets’ training facility down there – we were able to walk all around in between the various practice fields and watch an instructional league practice game in progress.  The game was poorly attended IMO, and I was hoping if nothing else you could pass this along to your followers:  If you’re a Mets fan with the financial resources and ability to go down there and stay for a week during spring training, you must do this.  I don’t even like the Mets and I had an amazing time.  I paid $20, got to do all that, and then sit 15 feet from David Wright during a baseball game.

I was really moved down there, just talking to people in bars and restaurants, reading the news, at just how hard Florida was hit by the Recession and how very little the Recovery has begun down there.  It occurred to me that there were a lot of parallels between Port St. Lucie and the Mets organization (and by extension, Mets fans) – you’re talking about an area and a team that have gone through really tough times lately, with more of the same on the horizon.  Visiting a beautiful spot and spending some tourist money in a stricken area to support your team seams like the perfect panacea for Port St. Lucie, the Mets, and Mets fans alike.

The Mets may not be great this year. The Treasure Coast economy may be even worse.  And, in my opinion anyway, Tradition Field probably falls near the low-end of the spring training facility rankings.  But the joint was spewing and inspiring optimism the other day, the way no place besides a spring training ballpark truly can. How can you not love that?

Dexter Fowler becomes first black player to play for the Cubs in the World Series

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Dexter Fowler #24 of the Chicago Cubs reacts after striking out in the first inning against the Cleveland Indians in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Tim Bradbury/Getty Images)
Tim Bradbury/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The last time the Cubs were in the World Series was 1945, two years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in baseball. As such, until Tuesday night, the Cubs never had a black player play for them in the World Series.

Dexter Fowler changed that, leading off the ballgame at Progressive Field against the Indians. Fowler was made aware of this fact three days ago by Rany Jazayerli of The Ringer:

Fowler, in that at-bat, went ahead in the count 2-1 but ended up striking out looking on a Corey Kluber sinker.

Drew Pomeranz does not need arm surgery

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 10:  Drew Pomeranz #31 of the Boston Red Sox throws a pitch in the fifth inning against the Cleveland Indians during game three of the American League Divison Series at Fenway Park on October 10, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Red Sox lefty Drew Pomeranz was of limited utility during the postseason as he began experiencing soreness in his left forearm near the end of the 2016 season. There was some thought that he might need offseason surgery but Pomeranz was examined by doctors who determined that he does not need any surgery, Evan Drellich of the Boston Herald reports. President of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said:

He has seen the doctor, the doctor looked at him. I can’t really disclose totally everything that was done, but the doctor said no surgical procedure and the doctor feels he will be ready for next spring training for us.

Pomeranz, 27, finished the 2016 regular season with an aggregate 3.32 ERA and a 186/65 K/BB ratio in 170 2/3 innings between the Padres and Red Sox. He operated out of the bullpen during the playoffs, allowing two runs on four hits and two walks with seven strikeouts over 3 2/3 innings.

The Red Sox acquired Pomeranz in a trade with the Padres in July. It was a trade that earned Padres GM A.J. Preller a 30-day suspension from Major League Baseball, as he reportedly kept two sets of medical records in order to deceive trade partners.