Carlos Silva says dugout dustup with Aramis Ramirez “was my fault”

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Carlos Silva refused to speak to the media following Wednesday’s dugout altercation with teammate Aramis Ramirez, but attempted to explain himself to reporters today.

Silva told Paul Sullivan of the Chicago Tribune that he was unaware the Cubs had made nine errors in their first three spring training games, so when he returned to the dugout and said they needed to “start making plays” following Ramirez’s error the third baseman “took it personally.”

In spring training, it’s a little harder because we don’t watch every single game. I didn’t even know my team had made that many errors either. That was a very hard inning, not only for my team or for my coaches, but for me. I was trying to do something here, and I gave up those two homers, and I came to the dugout, I tried to take it easy, to relax, to let it go.

The only thing I said was “we have to start making plays here.” He took it personally. I know it was my mistake. It was my fault because you don’t say anything. But he took it personally and that’s what happened. We argued in the dugout, and everything stayed there.

Silva also explained that his having to compete for a spot in the Cubs’ rotation had him on edge after the “absolutely brutal outing.” Manager Mike Quade doesn’t seem to think the incident was a big deal and Silva seems to be handling it pretty well after the fact, so assuming Ramirez isn’t holding a grudge Carlos Zambrano can reclaim his status as the most likely Cub to throw a punch in the dugout.

The deadline is 8 PM ET Monday for Shohei Ohtani situation to be resolved

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.