Scenes from Spring Training: A photo tour of the Royals camp


George:  “Kevin, you and I are pretty awesome, aren’t we?”

Kevin: “Yes, George. Yes we are. We could probably make this team if we tried, couldn’t we?”

George: “Yes, Kevin, we could.  Oh, Kevin: did I ever tell you about that night I had in Vegas?”

Kevin: “I swear, George, if you tell that story again I am going to have you barred from the facility.  I’m dead serious.”

My morning with Francoeur took a lot out of me so I decided to wander and snap photos rather than think anymore deep thoughts.

This place is pretty wander-worthy. Like the Reds and Indians, the Royals do their pregame warmups and BP on the practice fields, but unlike the Reds and Indians the practice fields are right behind the main park, not a mile down the road.  At the risk of giving that poor woman down in the office a heart attack, I walked it.

That, quite obviously, is Royals legend Frank White.  He is watching batting practice as it takes place on Frank White Field.  I find that to be great fun. I also found it great fun that coach Rusty Kuntz walked by right after this. I could not take a picture, though, because I was snickering.

That is grass painted with stripes like a football field.  I suppose it’s possible other teams have such fields out in the uncharted backwaters of the western spiral arms of their practice facilities, but I hadn’t seen one.  Just before I snapped this I saw a Royals trainer making a Royals player do one of those high-jump drills where the jumper tries to smack those pegs on the top of a pole around.  So basically, it’s like the NFL combine here.

Those are the parking spaces reserved for David and Dan Glass, owners of the Royals.  They are empty.  Those who follow the Royals closely and are aware of just how absent the Glass family tends to be will not be at all surprised by this.

I went back and watched BP after I took that. I stalked Francoeur a little more. Of the five BP pitches I saw him take, he hit three over the fence.  Then Kila Ka’aihue stepped in and murdered baseballs. I think they’re still flying as I type this. They have their own FAA call signs at this point. What I’m saying is that he hit the balls really, really hard and that they flew a long, long way.  For those still not getting what I’m saying: BOOM.

I’m going to eat something.  Ballgame in an hour.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.