Red Sox owner John Henry was fined half a million bucks for slamming revenue sharing


Recently, when Hank Steinbrenner and Randy Levine starting slamming teams who took revenue sharing and referring to it as “welfare,” I suggested that Bud Selig may take issue with the comments.  John Henry — who has himself slammed revenue sharing — admitted today that, yes, Bud Selig does take issue. And does so quite expensively:

Red Sox principal owner John Henry, in an interview on The Big Show, said that he was fined $500,000 by Major League Baseball for comments that he made about the sport’s current financial system. In late-2009, Henry told the Boston Globe that “seven chronically uncompetitive teams, five of whom have had baseball’s highest operating profits,” had received over $1 billion in revenue sharing money.

Harsh? Sure. But Bud Selig’s job is to keep the labor peace and keep the PR machine running smoothly. And as it has been pointed out in the past, the biggest threats to labor peace tend not to come from the owners battling the players, but the big owners battling the small owners.  The last thing he needs or wants is for owners to do public battle over the system to which they agreed top be bound.

And while I’m guessing Selig’s fine doesn’t take this into account, part of that half million has to be the chutzpah tax. As in, it takes an awful lot of chutzpah for owners of the teams whose revenue and value have multiplied exponentially under this system to speak out as if the system were robbing them blind.

Braves reassign Ronald Acuña to minor league camp

AP Photo/Lynne Sladky

As expected, the Braves on Monday reassigned outfield prospect Ronald Acuña to minor league camp.’s Mark Bowman notes Acuña will need to remain in the minors until at least April 13 if the Braves want to gain an extra year of control.

Acuña, 20, is the Braves’ best prospect and the second-best prospect in baseball behind Shohei Ohtani. He hit .325/.374/.522 with 31 doubles, 21 home runs, 82 RBI, 88 runs scored, and 44 stolen bases across three levels of the minor leagues last season, and he hit .432 with four homers and 11 RBI in 44 spring at-bats. Acuña has done everything he needs to do to warrant inclusion on the Braves’ Opening Day roster, but he won’t debut in the majors until at least mid-April.

Service time manipulation isn’t a new concept. Teams do it every year with their top prospects. The Cubs famously kept Kris Bryant in the minors until mid-April in 2015 — more on this shortly —  after a similar prior year and spring training to Acuña where he set the baseball world on fire. The MLBPA filed a grievance on Bryant’s behalf but it didn’t amount to anything. Bryant won the NL Rookie of the Year Award that year.

Clubs are incentivized to keep good players in the minor leagues for longer than is necessary, which means they are not putting their best product on the field. That’s a raw deal for fans as well as the players being manipulated in this way. This should be one of many things the union fights to change when the current collective bargaining agreement expires on December 1, 2021.

Update: This is laughable, but Braves GM Alex Anthopoulos can’t just outright admit they’re keeping Acuña down to manipulate his service time.