Michael Cuddyer out 7-14 days after having wart removed

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Michael Cuddyer’s attempt to self-treat a wart on his foot during the offseason proved unsuccessful, so now he’s expected to miss 7-14 days after leaving Twins camp and returning to Minnesota to have it removed by a doctor.

Aside from it probably being pretty embarrassing for Cuddyer to have his foot wart make headlines, this makes me wonder why teams don’t keep better track of players’ health during the offseason.

Cuddyer will make $10.5 million this season, yet his employers didn’t know he was trying to self-treat a wart on his foot that will now require leaving spring training and missing multiple weeks of camp? Or how about his teammate Francisco Liriano being lax with his offseason conditioning program? Shouldn’t his employers, who’re paying him $4.3 million this year, have known about his lack of workouts before Liriano showed up to spring training and quickly experienced shoulder soreness when he finally started to throw?

This isn’t meant as a criticism of the Twins, as they’re hardly alone in these types of situations and Cuddyer’s wart problem (combined with Liriano’s arm soreness last month) is simply what got me thinking about the issue. But really, if a company is spending $100 million per year on a relatively small group of employees whose performance is entirely dependent on their health and physical status shouldn’t there be constant updates and room to intervene before the season is a month away?

Taking it to an extreme, how much would it cost to have a trainer visit each player on the 40-man roster in person once every six weeks during the offseason? Even if it would cost, say, $200,000, that’s half of the MLB minimum salary and about .002 percent of the average team’s payroll. Or am I nuts?

Must-Click Link: The Day a Mascot Got Ejected

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Today Jonah Keri gives us a fantastic story about a crazy game.

The Dodgers played the Expos in Montreal 28 years ago today. The game went 22 innings. It was a 1-0 game. More notable than the 21 and a half innings of scoreless ball, however, was the fact that Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda got the Expos mascot — Youppi — ejected. The Dodgers and Expos didn’t score much that year overall, but when have you ever seen a mascot ejected?

Some good lunchtime reading for y’all, complete with silly GIFs and a video of the whole dang game if you hate yourself so much that you’d watch it all in its entirety.

Nicholas Castellanos hit an inside-the-park homer that shouldn’t have been

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Last night the Yankees pasted the Tigers in Detroit, but the hometown crowd did get something entertaining to send them on their way: an inside-the-park homer from Nicholas Castellanos.

At least that’s technically what it was. It would be a single and a three-base error if our official scoring made any sense.

Watch the play below. It’s all put in motion by Jacoby Ellsbury‘s decision to try to make a slide catch on the ball, misjudging it and allowing it to skip over 100 feet to the wall:

Since Ellsbury didn’t touch it it wasn’t called an error — errors are rarely if ever called on poor plays that don’t result in a fielder actually touching the ball — but it was certainly a mental error to not let the ball bounce and ensure that it didn’t get past him. Especially with such a big lead.

Oh well, that’s baseball for you.