Greg Goossen: 1945-2011

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Greg Goossen, who played six seasons in the majors for the Mets, Pilots, Brewers, and Senators, passed away Saturday at age 65.

Sadly, he was discovered in his home after failing to show up to the ceremony inducting him into the Notre Dame high school Hall of Fame.

Goossen’s obituary in the Los Angeles Times notes that he “worked as a private detective … dabbled as a boxing trainer, and was a stand-in for actor Gene Hackman in more than a dozen films” after his baseball career ended in 1970.

That’s quite an eclectic mix of activities and he also made a brief appearance as a character in Jim Bouton’s amazing book, Ball Four. Larry Stone of the Seattle Times recaps the short-but-amusing excerpt:

Bouton recalls a minor-league game he played against Goossen, a catcher in those days. A ball is bunted back to the pitcher, and Goossen came running out from behind the plate, screaming, “First base! First base!” The pitcher instead threw to second, and everyone was safe.

“As Goose walked back behind the plate, looking disgusted, I shouted at him from the dugout, ‘Goose, he had to consider the source.'”

When they are reunited as teammates in Seattle during spring training two years later, Goossen greets Bouton by saying, “Consider the source, huh?”

RIP.

Joe Maddon ejected in eighth inning of NLCS Game 4 after umpires overturn a Wade Davis strikeout

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Cubs manager Joe Maddon was once again ejected from an NLCS game, this time in Game 4.

In the top of the eighth inning, closer Wade Davis found himself in a bit of a pickle. He gave up a leadoff home run to Justin Turner, cutting the Cubs’ lead to 3-2. Davis then walked Yasiel Puig. He was able to get Andre Ethier to pop up, bringing up Curtis Granderson. Granderson worked the count 2-2, then fouled off a pitch. And then he appeared to swing through a curve that bounced in the dirt. Catcher Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out, but Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, so it was a foul ball.

Wolf conferred with the other umpires. After a brief delay, the strikeout was overturned and Granderson was given new life in the batter’s box. Only… replays showed that Wolf got it right the first time.

Understandably, Maddon was livid. On the broadcast, one could see Maddon gesturing to the umpires to look at the replay on the video board behind the stands in left field. The argument fell on deaf ears and he was ejected. Thankfully for the Cubs, justice prevailed and Davis struck out Granderson on the next pitch.

It’ll be interesting to see if Maddon makes any political comparisons after the game. He likened the slide rule, the impetus behind his Game 1 ejection, to the soda tax.