Welcome to St. Jetersburg

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The New York Times has a feature on the outrageously large house Derek Jeter has built down in Tampa. Cost?! No man can say!

The 30,875-square-foot mansion, which overlooks Hillsborough Bay, features seven bedrooms, nine bathrooms, a pool, two boat lifts, a drive-through portico and a pair of three-car garages flanking the north and south ends of the property.

Look, I know he has more money than God and is the biggest star in baseball over the past 20 years or so, but on what planet does a single guy with no kids need a 30,875-square-foot mansion?

Sometimes my wife and I play the “what would we do if we won $200 million in the Powerball” game.  It almost always involves a relatively human-scale yet fortified compound that is generally hidden from civilization.

Why anyone would want to build a giant, gleaming white house that fronts a public thoroughfare like Jeter’s does is beyond me. But it certainly does make all of the “Derek Jeter is a humble and private man” stuff that tends to get written about him seem rather silly. He can do whatever he wants, of course, but  there is nothing at all private or humble about this Xanadu he has constructed.

World Series Games 1 and 2 may be the hottest of all time

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The World Series is often played in near winter-like conditions. The 2008 Series was interrupted by a snowy, wintry mix. The 2012 World Series games in Detroit dipped into the 20s. It’s not uncommon to see players wearing balaclavas and other winter gear during the so-called “Fall Classic.”

Not this year, though. Indeed, this year we’re likely to see record high temperatures for Games 1 and 2 at Dodger Stadium.

As of this moment, WeatherUnderground.com forecasts a high in Los Angeles of 101 degrees for today’s World Series Media Day and highs of 102 and 98 for Games 1 and 2, respectively. First pitch for both games is just after 5PM Pacific time, when the sun will still be blazing. The sun will set about an hour or so in to the game which should cool things off somewhat, but the heat will definitely impact pregame workouts and the early innings. Fans showing up three or more hours before first pitch will do well to prepare themselves for the elements.

The hottest World Series game on record came in Phoenix for Game 1 in 2001 when the mercury stood at 94 degrees at game time. That year Major League Baseball unwisely demanded that the Chase Field roof be left open for the Diamondbacks-Yankees tilt. If there is a Game 6 and/or 7 things will be nicer as the long range forecast shows temperatures in the low 70s by then.

Hydrate well, Dodgers and Astros. Those of us watching from cooler temperatures and/or the comfort of our air conditioned homes will feel really bad for you.