Scenes from Spring Training: Random Notes from Tempe Diablo

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Doing my standard wander-and-observe thing this morning.  Among the highlights so far:

Mike Scioscia opened up his office for the media at 10AM.  When we came in he noticed a video camera from a member of the Japanese media and said “if I knew there was gonna be cameras here I would’ve fixed my hair.”  One of the other writers — one who, unlike Scioscia, has a full head of hair — sarcastically asked him what, exactly, fixing his hair entailed.  I interjected that I didn’t much care for his arrogantly hirsute tone. Scioscia chuckled. I’d like to think we bonded over that.

When things got serious Scioscia, in response to a question about the readiness of Jordan Walden, the Angels’ potential future closer, said “just because a player is experienced doesn’t mean he’s better. And just because a guy is inexperienced doesn’t mean he isn’t ready.”  That has to make Angels fans happy about the prospects, no?

Something else fun from his press conference: Trevor Bell is starting today, but Scioscia was asked who would start the next two days. Scioscia wouldn’t say. In fact he said “I’ll let you guys know that when I feel … you guys need to know that.”  On the walk out of the office an Angels media person said that Scioscia knows, of course, but he just doesn’t want his upcoming starters advertised.  I walked immediately back to the press box and within two minutes of Scioscia’s deflection I looked at MLB.com’s Game Notes page and saw that Scott Kazmir is pitching tomorrow and Joel Piniero is pitching on Monday.  Scioscia needs to get better at the cloak-and-dagger bit.

After that the Angels took the field. Scioscia and some of the veterans started in on some kind of signs drill, in which third base coach Dino Ebel flashed signs and the hitters and base runners carried the play out with a live batting practice pitcher.  Once, when Kendry Morales was up, he laid down a bunt. Scioscia, standing nearby, said “was that the squeeze?”  Morales said yes, it was. Scioscia, unconvinced, yelled down to Ebel “was that the squeeze?”  Ebel confirmed. Scioscia said “I’ll be damned. He caught it.”

Before the drill, coach Ebel made a signal up to the press box for the staff to cut off the music playing over the PA system.  It went off for the duration of the drill. As soon as it was over Vernon Wells — who wasn’t there when Ebel cut if off — realized that no music was playing, turned to the box and yelled “MUSIC!”  Within three seconds “When the Levee Breaks” came blasting out of the sound system.  Vernon Wells would be useful to have around for that sort of thing. He’s like Fonzie.

The pic to the right is a bucket full of balls, ready to be smacked around during BP.  I’m sad to see that the good people at David’s Sunflower Seeds actually encourage all that shell spitting.  Shameful, David’s. Shameful.

About a half hour until game time.  I’m going to get some grub.

Yoenis Cespedes blames a lack of golf for his early season slump

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Back during the 2015 playoffs the sorts of New York media types who love to find reasons to criticize players for petty reasons decided to criticize Yoenis Cespedes for playing golf the day of a playoff game. The Mets won the series with the Cubs during which the controversy, such as it was, occurred and it was soon dropped.

It was picked back up again in 2016 when Cespedes, while on the disabled list with a strained quad, was seen playing golf. Despite the fact that everyone involved said that golf did not contribute to his injury and that golf would have no impact on his injured quad, it was deemed “a bad look” by a columnist looking to get some mileage out of bashing Cespedes for having a hobby that probably half of all ballplayers share. They did it when he showed off his fancy cars too, by the way, even though just about every ballplayer has a fancy car or three. When you’re a superstar in New York — especially when you’re one with whom the media is not particularly close for various reasons — you’re going to catch hell for seemingly nothing.

Now there’s a new twist to the Cespedes golf saga. Yoenis himself says that his poor start — he’s hitting .195/.258/.354 and leads the league in strikeouts — is due to . . . not enough golf! From the New York Times:

He gave a possible reason for the poor start this weekend: not playing enough golf, a hobby beloved by many baseball players. And, yes, he is serious.

“In previous seasons, one of the things I did when I wasn’t going well was to play golf,” he said after a game on Friday in which he struck out four times but still drove in the go-ahead run in the 12th inning. “This year, I’m not playing golf.”

The story says Cespedes quit golf last summer because he worried that it was contributing to hamstring problems. He’s thinking about going back to it soon, as he thinks it’ll help his swing. Given that he’ll catch hell either way, he may as well do what he wants.