Adam Wainwright

Cardinals future dims without Adam Wainwright

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If the worse-case scenario comes to pass, the Cardinals are about to lose the right-hander who finished third in the NL Cy Young balloting in 2009 and second last year for the entire 2011 season due to Tommy John surgery. Adam Wainwright has won 39 games the last two years. In 2010, he went 20-11 for a team that went 86-76 as a whole.

So what would the Cardinals do without Wainwright?

The obvious answer is to sign Kevin Millwood. Sure, Millwood is coming off a season in which he went 4-16 with a 5.10 ERA. However, that was in the AL East and Camden Yards. Of the 30 homers he gave up in 190 2/3 innings, 20 came in the Orioles’ home park. He’d fare a lot better in that regard in Busch Stadium. Plus, he’d be working with Dave Duncan, who always seems to get more out of old arms than anyone would expect. And going by Millwood’s solid 132/65 K/BB ratio last season, the 36-year-old still has some bullets left.

Possible internal replacements include Kyle McClellan, Brian Tallet, Ian Snell and prospect Lance Lynn. Ideally, though, the Cards would keep McClellan and Tallet in the bullpen and let Lynn, who went 13-10 with a 4.77 ERA for Memphis last year, head back to Triple-A for a couple of months.

Regardless of who takes steps in, there’s really no replacing Wainwright. Chris Carpenter may still qualify as an ace, but both he and Jaime Garcia are injury risks. A rotation led by those two and sinkerballer Jake Westbrook should be a clear step down from the 2010 group.

Which is a problem. The Cards had the NL’s best or second best position player last year, the league’s second best pitcher and they got fine seasons from their two other stars in Matt Holliday and Carpenter, yet they finished a mere 10 games over .500 while playing in baseball’s weakest division.  Their offseason additions don’t add up to much, at least not after factoring in what they lost defensively, so without Wainwright, this may be nothing more than a .500 club in 2011.

And that’s certainly is not going to make keeping Albert Pujols any easier.

With Adam Jones ailing, Orioles add Borbon to outfield

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 13: Adam Jones #10 of the Baltimore Orioles reacts after being hit in the hand by a pitch in the sixth against the San Francisco Giants inning during an interleague game at AT&T Park on August 13, 2016 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK — With star outfielder Adam Jones nursing a tender hamstring, the Baltimore Orioles selected the contract of Julio Borbon from Double-A Bowie and optioned pitcher Mike Wright to Triple-A Norfolk.

Borbon was inserted in the starting lineup for Baltimore, batting ninth against hard-throwing New York Yankees rookie Chad Green.

“We had some other center field options,” manager Buck Showalter said. “Borbon is our best option at this point.”

Jones left Friday’s game in the second inning with a left hamstring strain. He departed the previous night’s game at Washington in the ninth inning with hamstring cramps and aggravated the injury hustling down the first base line on a soft grounder to third.

“I got a feeling that if he hadn’t had that first swinging bunt, it might not have been a problem,” Showalter indicated. “He’s not going to trot to first base as much as I talked to him about it before the game.”

Although Jones was unable to talk his way into Saturday’s lineup, Showalter speculated that he might be available to pinch-hit.

The 30-year old Borbon was 2 for 9 in five games with the Orioles earlier this season, but was designated for assignment on July 26. To create room for Borbon on the 40-man roster, pitcher Logan Ondrusek was designated for assignment on Friday.

No structural damage found in Andrew Benintendi’s knee

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - AUGUST 24:  Shortstop Matt Duffy #5 of the Tampa Bay Rays tags out Andrew Benintendi #40 of the Boston Red Sox after Dustin Pedroia grounded into the double play  during the seventh inning of a game on August 24, 2016 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Good news in Boston: An MRI on Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi‘s left knee revealed no structural damage.

Benintendi slipped while trying to avoid a tag at second base, injuring his leg, but it appears he’s avoided a serious injury. A timetable for his return isn’t known at this point, but the Red Sox expect to get him back before the end of the season.

Benintendi is hitting .324/.365/.485 with a homer and ten RBI in 21 games.