Bryce Harper

Bryce Harper No. 1, nine Royals on BA’s Top 100 Prospects


Baseball America put out its annual top 100 prospects list Wednesday, leading off with 2010 first overall pick Bryce Harper as the top prospect in the land. Here’s the top 10:

1. Bryce Harper (OF Nationals)
2. Mike Trout (OF Angels)
3. Jesus Montero (C Yankees)
4. Domonic Brown (OF Phillies)
5. Jeremy Hellickson (RHP Rays)
6. Julio Teheran (RHP Braves)
7. Aroldis Chapman (LHP Reds)
8. Eric Hosmer (1B Royals)
9. Mike Moustakas (3B Royals)
10. Wil Myers (OF Royals)

Six other Royals made the list, including left-handed pitchers John Lamb and Mike Montgomery back-to-back at Nos. 18 and 19. The Rays placed second with seven prospects, while the Braves and Yankees had six apiece.

At the other end of the spectrum, the Brewers placed no players on the list after trading No. 40 prospect Brett Lawrie for Shaun Marcum and No. 69 prospect Jake Odorizzi for Zack Greinke over the winter. The Marlins’ only representitive was Matt Dominguez at No. 81.

Given BA’s reputation for valuing upside, Hellickson as the top pitcher in the rankings is something of a surprise. While there’s a good case for him, he lacks the flash of Teheran or Chapman. That said, he probably is the best bet of the group to win 200 games as a major leaguer.

And as long as I’m throwing opinions around, I’d say BA was too low on the Giants’ Brandon Belt (No. 23), the Orioles’ Zach Britton (No. 28) and the Athletics’ Grant Green (No. 63). Placing too high were the White Sox’s Chris Sale (No. 20), new Ray Chris Archer (No. 27) and Jays catcher Travis d’Arnaud (No. 36).

Kyle Schwarber is in The Best Shape of His Life

CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 16:  Injured player Kyle Schwarber #12 of the Chicago Cubs is seen in the dugout before a game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Wrigley Field on August 16, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Getty Images
1 Comment

Kyle Schwarber made a quicker-than-expected recovery from ACL surgery and then, after an Arizona Fall League rehab assignment, was shuttled up to Cleveland for the World Series. But that’s not all he has done.

Schwarber is now the latest ever Best Shape of His Life All-Star. Or so says Kris Bryant, talking to Patrick Mooney of

“We’ve seen first-hand the work that he’s putting in and how hard he’s been going . . . Honestly, I saw him out — maybe a couple weeks after his surgery — and he’s moving around, walking. And I’m like: ‘Dang, this guy’s not human. How? I saw your leg bend in half, and you’re walking around. This is unbelievable . . .(It’s) watching him dripping with sweat every single day. Every single day, this guy is drenched. I feel like he’s in the best shape of his life (now). There was no doubt in my mind that he could do it. It was just a matter of if they let him.”

May as well just forfeit now, Indians. No way you can deal with an October BSOHL guy.


The Red Sox may not hire a general manager after all

Boston Red Sox President of Baseball Operations Dave Dombrowski talks with reporters during a baseball news conference at Fenway Park in Boston, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

When Mike Hazen left the Red Sox to go run the Diamondbacks, the Red Sox set out to look for a new general manager to replace him. Now, according to Pete Abraham, they may not replace him after all. Instead, president Dave Dombrowski may just leave the seat vacant and run the Sox all by himself.

Which, to be clear, is something Dombrowski is more than capable of doing, as he has been a general manager for decades now. A lot of this stuff is a function of job title-inflation, with guys in Dombrowski’s position being given elevated titles despite the fact that they are, more or less, still running the baseball operations department like they did when they were merely general managers. GM, meanwhile, has become a less authoritative position in many organizations, making it a somewhat less visible and perhaps less desirable job than it used to be.

Not that it’s totally about optics. The job of running a ball club is a lot more complicated than it used to be, and having one guy who can run big picture stuff and close deals like Dombrowski with another one being in charge of the more day-to-day tasks of the top baseball executive may be ideal. It also may help reign in some of the excesses of the top guy. Dombrowski, after all, may have been a master of a the big deal while running the Tigers, but in a lot of ways the win-now philosophy cost the club a lot of money and a lot of lower level talent. Another voice with a decent degree of power may be useful in that mix. As may a clear line of succession should Dombrowski decide to move on in a year or two.

Interesting times.