Jayson Werth: “I was trying to maximize things”

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Jayson Werth spoke to the media today, and the subject of his contract came up.  His comments — posted over at the Phillies Zone — were pretty interesting. He basically said that once he hit free agency he no longer viewed himself as a member of the Phillies but rather, viewed himself as a member of the union and, as such, was looking to “maximize things” contract-wise.  It’s uncommon candor on the subject.  Read his entire quote for the nuance.

This just illustrates one of the many reasons why Tony La Russa’s charge of union meddling in the Pujols negotiations was rather silly.  The union doesn’t need to pressure guys to try to take the biggest deal they can. They are all well-aware of the dynamics in play and that money they leave on the table is money that other, comparable players may not be able to get later as a result.  This doesn’t obligate them — guys will give hometown discounts they’ll avoid places they don’t want to play even if it means passing up a big offer — but the pressure is inherent, not a top-down thing in any given case.

The comment also illustrates the fact that, yeah, Werth was looking for the biggest bucks when he signed with Washington.  Nothing wrong with that. He can do whatever he wants and who are we to criticize him for it.  But it does mean that the stuff about liking the way the Nationals are heading and being excited about them and everything should probably be given appropriate weight in the grand scheme of things.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.