A couple of words on keeping score at the ballgame


I’m probably the worst scorekeeper in the world. I try to do it from time to time — used to do it a lot more — but I just don’t bother much anymore. Maybe it’s because I don’t do attention to detail very well. Maybe I’m just lazy. Maybe I just go to relatively few baseball games for a man with my job and when I’m there I just prefer to soak it in.  I don’t know. I told this story last spring during my spring training trip to Florida, but I’ll tell it again because it’s good:

I was in the Red Sox press box in Fort Myers during a game against the Rays.  I’m sitting next to Boston radio fixture Jonny Miller.  Miller and I are actually hitting it off pretty good.  He’s telling me war stories. He knows I’m a newbie so he’s giving me pointers about life in the box.  Nice afternoon!

Now, Miller keeps meticulous score during the game. He doesn’t miss a play. Around the bottom of the third inning the Red Sox PR guy comes by and tells Miller that that day’s pitcher, Jon Lester, is available for interviews. Miller turns to me and says — doesn’t really ask, just says — “you make sure to keep score for me while I’m gone.”  I hadn’t been keeping score, but I nodded and said I would.

I start in, utilizing my sloppy, inconsistent system, in smeary pen on the paper score sheet they hand out in the press room.  Miller is gone a long time. Two thirds of the Red Sox half of the third and the entire Rays half of the fourth, during which they sent ten guys to the plate. My score sheet is a complete disaster at this point and there’s no way Miller’s going to be able to follow it.  I can read it, however, so I figure that I’ll just read it back to him when he returns.

Miller comes back and says “hand me your score sheet.”  I tell him it’s hard to read. He either doesn’t hear this or doesn’t care and just repeats “hand me your score sheet.”  I give it to him and nod my head in shame. He starts writing, then stops. Then he just kind of looks at me with an expression that seems to say “kid, you got problems.” He hands it back to me and says, wearily, “just tell me who got the RBIs.”  I only knew this guy for about three hours at this point, but I felt like I was disappointing my father or something.

In light of that painful memory, I was really happy to see this Kickstarter fundraiser for an elegant and simplified little score book that some folks are trying to get off the ground.  This isn’t a paid ad or anything — and I don’t know the people making it — but it was brought to my attention this afternoon, I watched the little video and read the rundown and I rather like it.  Maybe hardcore guys and the Jonny Millers of the world would make fun of me if I had one, but I think I’d enjoy keeping score with it. It’s simple and small and I don’t care.  Check it out. I think more people would keep score if it were available.  And don’t be bothered by the fact that the narrator of the video has a voice that sounds EXACTLY like a girl I dated back in West Virginia when I was in the 11th grade because, nope, that didn’t bother me one bit, no sir!

And if the simplified scorebook is not your speed — if you’re a pro — here’s a fun blog post from Mike Curto, who announces Tacoma Rainers games, holding forth on his scorebook of choice.  It’s serious business.  Maybe I’d get into that one day. When I grow up.

Mike Scioscia will return as Angels manager in 2016

ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 21:  Manager Mike Scioscia #14 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the dugout during batting practice before a game against the Minnesota Twins at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 21, 2015 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Jonathan Moore/Getty Images)
Photo by Jonathan Moore/Getty Images

It was assumed already, but Mike Scioscia made it official during Monday’s press conference for new general manager Billy Eppler that he will return as Angels manager in 2016.

Scioscia, the longest-tenured manager in the majors, has been at the helm with the Angels since 2000. There was a clause in his contract which allowed him to opt out after the 2015 season, but he has decided to stay put. He still has three years and $15 million on his contract, which runs through 2018.

Jerry Dipoto resigned as Angels general manager in July amid tension with Scioscia, so there were naturally questions today about what to expect with first-time GM Eppler in the fold. According to David Adler of, Scioscia isn’t concerned.

“I think we’re going to mesh very well,” Scioscia said. “If we adjust, or maybe he adjusts to some of the things, there’s going to be collaboration that’s going to make us better.”

Eppler is the fourth general manager during Scioscia’s tenure with the team.

After winning the AL West last season, the Angels finished 85-77 this season and narrowly missed the playoffs. The team hasn’t won a postseason game since 2009.

Carlos Gomez says he’ll be in lineup for Wild Card game vs. Yankees

Houston Astros' Carlos Gomez hoops after scoring a run against the Texas Rangers in the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015, in Houston. Gomez scored from third base on a Bobby Wilson passed ball. The Astros won 4-2. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
AP Photo/Pat Sullivan

Astros center fielder Carlos Gomez sat out the final series of the regular season in order to rest a strained left intercostal muscle, but there was good news coming out of a workout today in advance of Tuesday’s Wild Card game vs. the Yankees.

This has been a lingering issue for Gomez, who missed 13 straight games with the injury last month. He aggravated the strain on a throw to home plate last Wednesday and was forced to sit while the Astros fought to keep their season alive. Astros manager A.J. Hinch told reporters last week that Gomez’s injury would typically take 45-50 days to recover from, so it’s fair to wonder how productive he can be during the postseason.

Gomez mostly struggled after coming over from the Brewers at the trade deadline, batting .242 with four home runs and a .670 OPS over 41 games.