Cameron Maybin discusses his Panda Express tweets

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I missed this yesterday, but apparently someone asked Cameron Maybin about that whole mess withe the Panda Express tweets:

“I’m on Twitter probation,” Maybin said through a big smile Thursday morning at the Padres complex. “I’m hoping we can sweep that one under the rug. I would like to say I love Panda Express. I have been going there since I was in high school. It’s the best cuisine around.”

He went to talk about how remarkable it was how quickly the fun little controversy spread.*  As someone who tweets a lot, I think about that stuff more and more.  Really, anyone who has any amount of readership on there is an exclamation away from infamy.  I think that’s simultaneously thrilling and scary.  Part of the deal, really. The immediacy is a two-way street.

*I don’t like the word “controversy” here because it implies some sort of legitimate question as to the propriety of the act when, in this case, it’s really not anything any reasonable person would really get mad about. It was funny.  At the same time, it was something that causes a stir, neutrally speaking, so it’s not sufficient to say “it was nothing.”

What we really need here is a single word that captures the following concept: “an incident that is harmless and fun and only superficially and comically troublesome yet that one that is still worthy of note for people who traffic in such silliness on a regular basis.”  I’m blanking.  Maybe we just need to make up one.  I’ll accept all suggestions in the comments.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

Associated Press
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Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.