And we now begin eight and a half months of freaking out about Sabathia’s opt-out clause

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More weighty news relating to CC Sabathia than his choice of breakfast cereals involves his contract. As in, the fact that he has the ability to opt-out of it after this year if he wants, and that has caused no shortage of consternation among Yankees fans. Yankees fans who, as of this past winter, are now acutely aware that, no, they can’t just sign every damn player they want.

So, as Sabathia hit Tampa today, and after the fun stuff about his weight was discussed, he was asked about his opt-out clause.  His comments: a statement that he has no intention of leaving the Yankees but that “anything is possible in a contract.”  He then added that he won’t be discussing it anymore because, you know, there’s work to be done.

I have no idea how else one could handle that. It would be the height of folly for Sabathia to verbally commit to any course of action right now. To do so risks him being characterized as a villain or a liar or a mercenary or whatever if he ends up leaving. Or it foolishly cuts off his negotiating leverage if he indeed plans to stay. Or — and I realize this is totally insane — he might not have any idea what’s going to happen this year and has no idea what he’s going to do about his opt-out. In light of that, it makes absolute perfect sense for Sabathia to be positive about staying in New York but ultimately non-committal.

But I have this feeling that — if Sabathia holds true to the smart course and declines to discuss this matter any further until next fall — the “anything is possible” quote will be cited umpteen times in the next several months as Meaning Something Terribly Important. And with it will be accompanied by the expected freaking out by the expected freak-outers.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.