Mat Latos’ innings will not be limited this season

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The Padres are ready to turn Mat Latos loose.

Completely.

The 23-year-old right-hander posted a stellar 2.92 ERA and 1.08 WHIP across 31 starts last season as a big league sophomore, striking out 189 batters and walking only 50.

His strikeout total might have been even higher and his rate stats might have fallen even further, but the Padres played it safe in September and October, finding extra pockets of rest between starts for him down the stretch and keeping his pitch counts low. He made only one start of six innings or more after September 7.

That will all change this year.

Padres manager Bud Black told Bill Center of the San Diego Union-Tribune on Saturday that Latos will not be limited in any way this season. At least, not by the San Diego coaching staff.

“Not to the point that there were last year, when it was a topic from the first day of spring training,” said the skipper. “There will be no hard numbers in regards to his innings pitched.”

In the recently launched Rotoworld Fantasy Draft Guide, we have Latos winning 13 games against a 3.15 ERA, 1.13 WHIP and 185 strikeouts. Check out the Draft Guide for over 1,000 more profiles and projections.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.