Does Pujols’ self-imposed deadline really matter?

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Albert Pujols told the Cardinals a couple of months ago that he wants all negotiations involving a possible contract extension to stop once he arrives at spring training so that he can avoid distractions and focus on getting ready for the start of the regular season. That self-imposed deadline is just three days away and most national baseball reporters are hearing that talks are not going well.

Now comes the question: does that deadline really matter? If the Cardinals don’t strike a deal with baseball’s best hitter by Wednesday, will they no longer be allowed to make offers? Will Albert’s agent, Dan Lozano, screen any and all phone calls from the Cardinals’ front office after February 16?

St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist Bernie Miklasz, for one, thinks the deadline means next to nothing.

Miklasz wrote in his Sunday column titled “What Matters Most To Pujols?” that the Wednesday deadline is “bogus” and that there is “no need to have a 19th nervous breakdown over it.” More from Berine:

If the deadline passes without a contract in No. 5’s hands, there’s no legitimate reason to assume it means the likely ending of the Pujols-Cardinals union. It doesn’t mean that all hope is lost. It doesn’t mean Pujols is going to bolt as a free agent after the season and jump to the enemy Chicago Cubs.

This spring-training deadline is merely the first checkpoint.

That’s all. Nothing more.

Miklasz makes a great point. Pujols has, time and time again, expressed a desire to remain in St. Louis for the rest of his career. He has a charitable foundation there, a restaurant, a couple of kids in school, and his wife’s family is from nearby Kansas City. If the Cardinals give him what he wants near the end of spring training, or even during the regular season, what’s to say he doesn’t accept?

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.