The Wilpons have more than just the bankruptcy trustee to worry about

8 Comments

For those of you following the Wilpon/Mets/Madoff train wreck, there’s a fascinating story in today’s New York Times which suggests that the Wilpons’ legal problems may just be getting started.

The upshot: when Madoff got arrested, the Wilpons and Saul Katz were strapped. Coming to their rescue: as many as eight banks who provided them with financing on which Sterling Equities continues to rely.  The Times talks to multiple banking and legal experts who suggest that, in light of the current lawsuit — and all of the ugliness it’s dredging up — the banks could do any number of things, none of which are good for the Wilpons and Katz.

Things like calling in their loans now, which would put even more financial pressure on them to sell the Mets. Another possibility: they could comb through all of their own financial records relating to the Wilpons searching for something — anything — which, in light of the new information we’re all learning, could be used to cast the Wilpons in a bad light.

I don’t pretend to understand the complexity of the financial stuff.  But I certainly do understand the overall when-it-rains-it-pours dynamic of these things. We’d all like to believe that people will stand strong with us when things get bad, but when a scandal erupts or a suit gets filed people either run for cover, look for someone else to throw under the bus or both.  These banks are no innocents themselves. J.P. Morgan, for example, has its own Madoff-related problems.  You can bet that if there’s a way to shift blame to or share blame with someone else, they’ll take it.  The first big conversation with the lawyers in any mess like this involves the question of “who else can be invited to this party?”

Every day the Wilpons don’t settle with the trustee is another day when someone, somewhere, will consider jumping on the pile.

Zach Britton’s consecutive saves streak has ended at 60

Greg Fiume/Getty Images
Leave a comment

On September 20, 2015, Zach Britton blew a save against the Rays. Little did he know that he wouldn’t blow another save until August 23, 2017, converting 60 consecutive save opportunities.

Britton took the mound with a 7-5 lead in the top of the ninth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Athletics. He yielded a single to Jed Lowrie, a double to Boog Powell, an RBI single to Marcus Semien, and a sacrifice fly to Matt Joyce to allow the A’s to close the two-run deficit. In the next at-bat, he uncorked a wild pitch and then walked Khris Davis before being removed from the game. Miguel Castro relieved Britton, but walked Ryon Healy on four pitches to load the bases. Castro wriggled out of the jam by getting Matt Olson to pop up and striking out Matt Chapman, stranding two of Britton’s runners.

Britton entered Wednesday’s action 11-for-11 in save chances on the season with a 2.88 ERA and a 19/12 K/BB ratio in 25 innings. He missed two months earlier this season with a strained left forearm.

Noah Syndergaard’s bullpen session pushed back

Joe Skipper/Getty Images
Leave a comment

710 WOR’s Wayne Randazzo reports that Mets starter Noah Syndergaard‘s bullpen session has been pushed back a day or two. According to manager Terry Collins, it’s just a precaution. But, given the Mets’ history with injuries turning out to be much worse than expected, this is a bit concerning.

Syndergaard, 24, has been on the disabled list since the beginning of May with a partial tear of his right lat muscle. Prior to his April 30 start in which he suffered the lat injury, Syndergaard refused to undergo an MRI for his sore biceps.

In his five starts before the injury, Syndergaard gave up 14 runs (10 earned) on 28 hits and two walks with 32 strikeouts in 27 1/3 innings.