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A bit more on the distinction between the Wilpons and the McCourts

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In that last post about the difference between the McCourt situation and the Wilpon situation, I said that there was a difference between Wilpon’s ownership interest in SNY and the Dodgers’ ownership of broadcast rights.  That distinction led to a couple of similar reader comments. Like this one:

The situations are identical, just different structures. The major asset of SNY is the rights to Mets games, right? McCourt has Dodgers rights He could create a network and sell the broadcast rights to for $bazillion
He could then sell the network which is his personal asset to pay off his divorce. And that is OK where selling the rights to Fox is not?  SNY is just a shell for the rights that is packaged as an operating company.  No difference at all.

It’s actually even more stark than my reader says.  The Mets — as a team — likely get pennies on the dollar of what their broadcast rights would be worth on the open market because Wilpon is on both sides of the deal with SNY.   By underpaying for Mets rights, SNY is worth more and the money it keeps — as opposed to the money the Mets would have received — is not subject to revenue sharing with the other 29 clubs.  This has been going on for years, by the way. Ted Turner used to do with the Braves and TBS, albeit for some different reasons.

All of that said, I don’t disagree with my reader’s analysis. The point I was trying to make in the last post — and in hindsight utterly failed to make — is not that there is a fundamental difference between broadcast rights and regional sports network ownership interest. It’s that Bud Selig does and will continue to treat such things differently — and thus he will likely treat McCourt and Wilpon differently — even if doing so is disingenuous.

Why?  Because if he acknowledges that straight broadcast rights and the revenues of team-owned cable networks are essentially the same, the economic structure of baseball unravels.  Because it’s not really a structure. It’s an uneasy peace between big market, high revenue teams and the small ones.

That peace is predicated, in part, on the big clubs and the little clubs being allowed their respective excesses.  The big clubs can house their money in enterprises that are not subject to revenue sharing. Think the Red Sox investing in NASCAR teams and, more traditionally, big teams operating RSNs.  For their part, the small clubs are allowed to pocket revenue sharing money rather than invest it in their teams. At least within reason, as Jeff Loria and the Marlins found out last year.  Each type of team chafes at what the other is allowed to get away with, but they mostly keep their powder dry because everyone is getting rich.

Practically speaking, if the Wilpons are forbidden from using SNY money to settle their Madoff problems on a theory that doing so would harm the Mets, the fiction that this money is non-baseball-related is exposed and the Pirates and Royals of the world will demand that they be given a share of the RSN money the big teams are making.

Likewise, if Frank McCourt is allowed to use straight broadcast rights money to pay off his wife, the Pirates and other small teams — who are smaller than the Dodgers but, like the Dodgers, don’t have an RSN —  will feel free to pocket their own rights money and put even less into their teams than they already do, which will be a bridge too far for both the big clubs and the fan bases of the small teams (pocket the gate receipts and the concessions, Mr. Loria, but too many people are watching when you pocket the TV money).

If all of this sounds borderline corrupt to you — if it sounds like, hey, at some point someone should have filed a lawsuit over it — don’t worry! You’re not crazy!  Someone probably should have long ago.  But they didn’t.  Why? Because there are only like three owners in all of baseball who weren’t admitted to the very cozy ownership club before Selig took over. The price of their entry to the club: fealty to Selig and the highly anti-competitive arrangement described above.  Indeed, every year there are a half dozen things that happen that, if baseball teams were run as independent businesses who felt free to vindicate their rights through legal action, would lead to lawsuits.

But the lawsuits never come because no one is willing.  Big city teams are given monopolies over huge media markets so that they can build media empires. Small market owners are given the keys to small teams that, while not as lucrative on a cash flow basis, are almost certain to appreciate nicely and — with a few high profile exceptions like media revenues — they’re allowed to treat as their own private piggy bank.  It’s not ideal and it’s not fair, but it ain’t a bad bargain.

At least if you own a baseball team.

BBWAA votes to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning next year

Cooperstown
Associated Press
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In addition to naming the Spink Award winner this morning, the Baseball Writers Association of America voted today to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with next year’s vote for the 2018 induction class.

As of now, writers are encouraged to make their votes public and, if they do, they are placed on the BBWAA website. They are not required to, however, and a great many Hall of Fame voters do not. While ballot secrecy is laudable in politics, the Hall of Fame vote brings with it a fundamentally different set of concerns and sentiment has increasingly favored transparency, as opposed to secrecy when it comes to the Hall of Fame.

While some in opposition to this move may claim that public ballots will only lead to criticism, our view is that if you can’t handle some reasonable criticism over your Hall of Fame ballot, you probably need to get out of the business of making history, which is what voting for the Hall of Fame really is.

The Yankee2 to retire Derek Jeter’2 number next 2ea2on

Derek Jeter
Getty Images
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RE2PECT: The Yankees just announced that they will retire Derek Jeter’s number 2 next season. The ceremony will take place on May 14, 2017 at Yankee Stadium.

With Jeter’s number 2 retired the Yankees will have retired 21 numbers. Twenty-two if you count number 8 twice, given that it was retired for both Yogi Berra and Bill Dickey. They also have retired 42 twice, once for Jackie Robinson, which every team has retired, and once for Mariano Rivera who donned 42 before the league-wide retirement of the number. The Yankees will also have put every single-digit number on the shelf. Except for zero, anyway, which no Yankees player has ever worn.

The retired pinstripes break down as follows:

1 Billy Martin
3 Babe Ruth
4 Lou Gehrig
5 Joe DiMaggio
6 Joe Torre
7 Mickey Mantle
8 Yogi Berra
8 Bill Dickey
9 Roger Maris
10 Phil Rizzuto
15 Thurman Munson
16 Whitey Ford
20 Jorge Posada
23 Don Mattingly
32 Elston Howard
37 Casey Stengel
42 Mariano Rivera
44 Reggie Jackson
46 Andy Pettitte
49 Ron Guidry
51 Bernie Williams