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A bit more on the distinction between the Wilpons and the McCourts

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In that last post about the difference between the McCourt situation and the Wilpon situation, I said that there was a difference between Wilpon’s ownership interest in SNY and the Dodgers’ ownership of broadcast rights.  That distinction led to a couple of similar reader comments. Like this one:

The situations are identical, just different structures. The major asset of SNY is the rights to Mets games, right? McCourt has Dodgers rights He could create a network and sell the broadcast rights to for $bazillion
He could then sell the network which is his personal asset to pay off his divorce. And that is OK where selling the rights to Fox is not?  SNY is just a shell for the rights that is packaged as an operating company.  No difference at all.

It’s actually even more stark than my reader says.  The Mets — as a team — likely get pennies on the dollar of what their broadcast rights would be worth on the open market because Wilpon is on both sides of the deal with SNY.   By underpaying for Mets rights, SNY is worth more and the money it keeps — as opposed to the money the Mets would have received — is not subject to revenue sharing with the other 29 clubs.  This has been going on for years, by the way. Ted Turner used to do with the Braves and TBS, albeit for some different reasons.

All of that said, I don’t disagree with my reader’s analysis. The point I was trying to make in the last post — and in hindsight utterly failed to make — is not that there is a fundamental difference between broadcast rights and regional sports network ownership interest. It’s that Bud Selig does and will continue to treat such things differently — and thus he will likely treat McCourt and Wilpon differently — even if doing so is disingenuous.

Why?  Because if he acknowledges that straight broadcast rights and the revenues of team-owned cable networks are essentially the same, the economic structure of baseball unravels.  Because it’s not really a structure. It’s an uneasy peace between big market, high revenue teams and the small ones.

That peace is predicated, in part, on the big clubs and the little clubs being allowed their respective excesses.  The big clubs can house their money in enterprises that are not subject to revenue sharing. Think the Red Sox investing in NASCAR teams and, more traditionally, big teams operating RSNs.  For their part, the small clubs are allowed to pocket revenue sharing money rather than invest it in their teams. At least within reason, as Jeff Loria and the Marlins found out last year.  Each type of team chafes at what the other is allowed to get away with, but they mostly keep their powder dry because everyone is getting rich.

Practically speaking, if the Wilpons are forbidden from using SNY money to settle their Madoff problems on a theory that doing so would harm the Mets, the fiction that this money is non-baseball-related is exposed and the Pirates and Royals of the world will demand that they be given a share of the RSN money the big teams are making.

Likewise, if Frank McCourt is allowed to use straight broadcast rights money to pay off his wife, the Pirates and other small teams — who are smaller than the Dodgers but, like the Dodgers, don’t have an RSN —  will feel free to pocket their own rights money and put even less into their teams than they already do, which will be a bridge too far for both the big clubs and the fan bases of the small teams (pocket the gate receipts and the concessions, Mr. Loria, but too many people are watching when you pocket the TV money).

If all of this sounds borderline corrupt to you — if it sounds like, hey, at some point someone should have filed a lawsuit over it — don’t worry! You’re not crazy!  Someone probably should have long ago.  But they didn’t.  Why? Because there are only like three owners in all of baseball who weren’t admitted to the very cozy ownership club before Selig took over. The price of their entry to the club: fealty to Selig and the highly anti-competitive arrangement described above.  Indeed, every year there are a half dozen things that happen that, if baseball teams were run as independent businesses who felt free to vindicate their rights through legal action, would lead to lawsuits.

But the lawsuits never come because no one is willing.  Big city teams are given monopolies over huge media markets so that they can build media empires. Small market owners are given the keys to small teams that, while not as lucrative on a cash flow basis, are almost certain to appreciate nicely and — with a few high profile exceptions like media revenues — they’re allowed to treat as their own private piggy bank.  It’s not ideal and it’s not fair, but it ain’t a bad bargain.

At least if you own a baseball team.

Joe Mauer reveals he’s had blurred vision since 2013 concussion

Joe Mauer
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After a decade as the best all-around catcher in baseball Joe Mauer suffered a concussion in August of 2013 that forced him to change positions and marked the end of his time as a great hitter.

Mauer was doing his usual thing at the time of the concussion, hitting .324 with a .404 on-base percentage and .880 OPS. Since returning from the brain injury he’s hit .270 with a .348 on-base percentage and .725 OPS while seeing his numbers decline across the board.

Mauer revealed today to Brian Murphy of the St. Paul Pioneer Press that “lingering symptoms occasionally blurred his vision at the plate the past two seasons” and “he will experiment hitting with sunglasses for the first time to improve his pitch tracking” this season.

Here’s more from Murphy:

Bright sunshine sometimes triggered blurred vision that Mauer links to the concussion with which he was diagnosed in August 2013 after absorbing at least “two significant blows” from foul tips while he was still catching.

“I don’t want that to be kind of an excuse. If I’m out there, I’m out there. That’s just the way I am,” Mauer said. “There are times I’ve gone up to the plate and I just couldn’t pick up the ball. That’s part of the frustration because I’m trying to do everything I can to get back. It just takes time.”

There are more quotes along those same lines and Mauer’s numbers in night games were much better than his numbers in day games last season.

I live in Minnesota and it has been incredibly frustrating to see such a large (or at least vocal) segment of the Twins fan base treat Mauer’s steep decline as if it has nothing to do with the significant brain trauma he suffered. I’m hopeful that Mauer going public about literally struggling to see the baseball while at the plate will convince people to treat him more humanely, but that’s probably wishful thinking at this point.

What a shame, on every level.

Masahiro Tanaka can’t say for sure if he’ll be ready by Opening Day

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Yankees starter Masahiro Tanaka said today that he “can’t say for sure” whether he’ll be ready for Opening Day.

Tanaka underwent arthroscopic surgery in late November to remove a bone spur from his right elbow. Tanaka threw off a bullpen mound Tuesday for the first time since undergoing a cleanup procedure on his right elbow last October and, while healthy, may be behind other pitchers.

Tanaka posted a 3.51 ERA and a 139/27 K/BB ratio across 154 innings last season. He also has a partially torn UCL he’s been pitching through for some time which is always something the Yankees have on their mind when it comes to schedules and workouts for their ace.

Denard Span, not Angel Pagan, will be Giants’ center fielder and leadoff hitter

Denard Span
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Making official what was assumed when the Giants signed Denard Span to a three-year, $31 million contract last month, manager Bruce Bochy announced that Span will start in center field and bat leadoff.

That means 34-year-old Angel Pagan, who’s been the Giants’ starting center fielder and primary leadoff hitter for the past four seasons, will slide to left field and bat further down in the lineup. About a month before the Span signing Bochy said Pagan would remain in the center fielder/leadoff role, but the situation obviously changed.

It’s a move that makes sense, because Span–if healthy following hip surgery–is a superior defensive center fielder with better on-base skills. And if Pagan doesn’t bounce back following a rough 2015 season then having him in left field will make it easier for the Giants to platoon him or bench him in favor of, say, Gregor Blanco or a bigger bat.

Pitchers to receive new visor-like protective headgear

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For the past few years MLB, the MLBPA and cap and helmet manufacturers have been working on various models of protective headgear for pitchers. Some of the models have been unworkable, some of them have not met the satisfaction of pitchers and others have, well, looked a little odd. At present the only pitcher who routinely wears any headgear is Alex Torres, who wears the bulky isoBLOX helmet.

Now, however, there is a new option. And, as you can see above it’s a bit different than what we’ve seen before. It’s more or less like a visor, which will have a nylon top on them to give a full cap-like appearance. The ear flaps will be lefty and righty-specific, given that righties are more likely to be hit on the right and lefties on the left given their follow-throughs.

The new caps will be given out to players this spring and, like the old ones, will be used or not used at the choice of the players. You can read more about the new helmet at ESPN’s Outside the Lines report.