Nick Swisher is a social media superstar. And that’s good news for all of us.

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There’s a story over at the Wall Street Journal today about how Nick Swisher has enhanced his personal brand, as they say, and is on track to be a bigtime product endorsement dude because of his social media cachet (i.e. he Twitters real good):

Mr. Swisher is a good player but is not on a Cooperstown track. As celebrity endorsements move beyond the superstars, the mid-level player with personality and social-media savvy can reach endorsement and name-recognition levels that were once only the domain of the best of the best, said David Carter, author of the recent book, Money Games, and head of the USC Sports Business Institute.

Good for Swisher, because he seems like a neat guy. And because we West Virginia-raised, Ohio State attendees have to stick together. But really, the best part of this is the inevitable side effects.

Swisher and most of the other athletes who are on Twitter a lot are there because they want to be there. They’re extroverts and over-sharers who naturally gravitate to the medium for the same reasons all of us other deadenders who spend our days glued to social media do. But now that it’s being talked up as a bonafide path to endorsement deals, you just know that agents and handlers are going to push their athlete-clients into getting on the Twitter more and more as a business proposition.

I can’t wait for that to happen. Because the Nick Swishers of the world know the rules and the etiquette of it all and are thus predictable and, it must be said, a tad boring.  In contrast, as those who might otherwise avoid social media are forced into it, there will be all kinds of social stumbles, scandals and embarrassment. And that’s exactly the kind of thing we Twitter deadenders absolutely live for.

How Yu Darvish tipped his pitches during the World Series

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You hear a lot about pitchers tipping pitches. It’s often offered up post-facto as an excuse for poor performance by the pitcher himself or his own team. It’s sort of like the “best shape of my life” thing being offered in the offseason to talk about why the player got injured or played badly the previous year. “Smitty’s stuff is still great, he was just tipping his pitches,” said a source close to the player whose stuff is not really great anymore.

Which isn’t to say that pitchers don’t tip pitches. Of course they do. Opposing teams look for it, pick up on it and take advantage of it whenever they can. It’s just that (a) the opposing team has an interest in not talking about it, lest the pitcher STOP tipping its pitches; and (b) the guy actually tipping his pitches doesn’t want to talk specifically about it lest he starts doing it again.

Which is what makes this article at Sports Illustrated so interesting. In it Tom Verducci talks to an anonymous Houston Astros player who explains how Dodgers starter Yu Darvish was tipping his pitches during the World Series, leading to him getting absolutely shellacked in Games 3 and 7. The upshot: the Astros knew when a slider or a cutter was coming, they waited for it and they teed off.

Darvish is a free agent now. I’m guessing, whoever signs him, knows exactly what they’ll gave him work on the first day of spring training.