Mike Lowell is definitely retired and “hip replacement is most likely inevitable”

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Rob Bradford of WEEI.com caught up with Mike Lowell, who made it clear that he’s definitely retired and revealed that his surgically repaired hip “has gone a little bit downhill.”

Lowell underwent surgery on his right hip following the 2008 season and recent X-rays showed that “it has gotten progressively worse.”

Here’s more from Lowell, who hit .239 with a .674 OPS in a part-time role for the Red Sox last year:

Without medication or pain management I don’t think I can run 50 yards right now, I know I can’t. I don’t want to be taking meds to go about my day-to-day life. I feel like my quality of life is going down a little bit. I want to teach my kid how to run the bases in Little League instead of just standing there. It seems trivial but it bothers me that I can’t do it.

Bradford writes that Lowell “understands that a hip replacement is most likely inevitable” and the four-time All-Star explained that he doesn’t regret using “anti-inflammatories and pain medication” to get through last season even if it wasn’t “the greatest thing for the hip” long term.

Lowell became a full-time player for the Marlins in 2000 and ceased being a regular for the Red Sox after 2009. During that decade-long stretch he ranked seventh among third baseman in Wins Above Replacement, trailing only Alex Rodriguez, Chipper Jones, Scott Rolen, Eric Chavez, Adrian Beltre, and Troy Glaus.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”