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New York Times: the Wilpons were warned that Madoff wasn’t a sound investment

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We may have actual legal documents from the case against the Wilpons as early as today, with both sides giving up all pretense of the conciliatory posture that occasioned the documents being sealed in the first place. The gloves are off and the bankruptcy trustee of the Madoff estate and the Wilpons are going at each other full-bore.

And the best thing about it for all of us is that each side has its own media operation: the New York Times is clearly getting passed information and spin from either the trustee himself or from someone sympathetic to his cause. The Daily News, in contrast, is clearly getting passed information and spin from either the Wilpons, their lawyers or from someone sympathetic to their cause. Unless you have a vested interest in the Mets or the Madoff debacle — and condolences to any of you who do — this is all great fun.

Today it’s the New York Times’ turn. Stung, it would seem, by being called lying extortionists by the Wilpons, Team Trustee provides the Times with some information that, if true, undercuts the Wilpons’ assertions that they were just as duped as anyone else by Bernie Madoff.

This comes in the form of a description of a lawsuit filed against the Wilpons last year by the widow of one of their former employees who lost a ton in their Madoff-invested 401K. In it she alleges that  multiple third parties — in one case the investment bank Merrill Lynch — made clear their concerns to Wilpon and his partner Saul Katz about investing with Madoff, yet they continued to invest with Madoff anyway, putting over 90% of the company’s 401K funs in Madoff securities.  The suit also alleges that Madoff had his own money invested with Wilpon’s company, thereby creating a conflict of interest on the part of the Wilpons when it came to deciding where the 401K money should go and how to invest it.

None of which is to say that the Wilpons were actively involved or even technically complicit in Madoff’s fraud. It’s merely to say that, unlike the other duped investors like Wayne Gretzky or Stephen Spielberg or whoever, the Wilpons were under totally different duties, subject to greater information and more closely-related to Madoff than anyone else who has been dragged into this case so far.  That’s what makes them different. That’s also what has them in the mess they’re in now.

I’m sure that the Daily News will counter this somehow. I’m sure a certain commenter who has been showing up in all the Wilpon threads will either echo those talking points or even have them before the Daily News does (uncanny, that!). Which is cool. All is fair in litigation and war. And, to be honest, I like the little back and forth we’ve been having in the comments section. Keeps everyone active and thinking.

But if the counter punch does come, it had better get a tad more refined. Because the more these allegations stack up — from disparate sources, not just the trustee — the less plausible the “Wilpon was totally blindsided by Madoff” line becomes.

And I’m not buying for a second that the Wilpons are in better shape now that settlement talks have broken down, which some are arguing. That’s simply ludicrous.  That is, unless you believe that having allegations splashed all over The Paper of Record that you screwed a widow out of her $300K retirement fund due to your negligence and conflict of interest to be a good thing. And unless you like your legal fees to shoot through the roof and your potential exposure to go from large-but-finite to “who the hell knows?”

Video: Aledmys Diaz hits a grand slam in remembrance of Jose Fernandez

ST. LOUIS, MO - JULY 21: Aledmys Diaz #36 of the St. Louis Cardinals hits an RBI single against San Diego Padres in the sixth inning at Busch Stadium on July 21, 2016 in St. Louis, Missouri.  (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)
Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images
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Cardinals shortstop Aledmys Diaz was childhood friends with Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez, so it was expected when Diaz took time away from the team on Monday to visit Fernandez’s family in Miami. They grew up on the same street in Cuba and played for the same youth baseball team and both would ultimately wind up playing Major League Baseball in the United States.

In the bottom of the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Reds, Diaz hit a 2-1 Robert Stephenson fastball out to left-center field for a no-doubt grand slam. Teammate Yadier Molina gave Diaz a tight hug as he crossed home plate.

Before Tuesday’s game, Diaz said that the best way to honor Fernandez was to play with his passion, as MLB.com’s Jenifer Langosch reports. Diaz said, “I only play for [Fernandez’s] family right now.”

Here’s the video.

AL East still mathematically undecided as Red Sox lose, Blue Jays win

NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 27:  David Price #24 of the Boston Red Sox pitches in the first inning against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium on September 27, 2016 in the Bronx borough of New York City.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
Jim McIsaac/Getty Images
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The Red Sox would have clinched the AL East if one of two things happened on Tuesday night: the Red Sox themselves beat the Yankees, or the Orioles defeated the Blue Jays. Neither happened.

The Jays soundly took down the Orioles 5-1 behind six strong innings from Aaron Sanchez. Josh Donaldson went 2-for-2 with a two-run home run and a pair of walks and leadoff batter Ezequiel Carrera went 2-for-3 with a solo homer, an RBI single, a walk, and three runs scored.

Meanwhile, at Yankee Stadium, the Yankees outlasted the Red Sox for a 6-4 win, responding to both two-run innings the Sox had in the sixth and seventh with a run in the sixth and two in the seventh. Gary Sanchez hit his 20th homer of the season. Didi Gregorius and Tyler Austin also contributed dingers. Starter Luis Cessa pitched well, limiting the Sox to two runs over six innings on five hits and a walk with two strikeouts. Red Sox starter David Price struggled, yielding six runs in 6 1/3 innings. Yankees reliever Tyler Clippard got into trouble in the ninth inning but was able to wiggle out of trouble to finish out the game.

Once again, the Red Sox will be able to clinch the AL East on Wednesday with a win over the Yankees or a Blue Jays loss to the Orioles.