New York Times: the Wilpons were warned that Madoff wasn’t a sound investment

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We may have actual legal documents from the case against the Wilpons as early as today, with both sides giving up all pretense of the conciliatory posture that occasioned the documents being sealed in the first place. The gloves are off and the bankruptcy trustee of the Madoff estate and the Wilpons are going at each other full-bore.

And the best thing about it for all of us is that each side has its own media operation: the New York Times is clearly getting passed information and spin from either the trustee himself or from someone sympathetic to his cause. The Daily News, in contrast, is clearly getting passed information and spin from either the Wilpons, their lawyers or from someone sympathetic to their cause. Unless you have a vested interest in the Mets or the Madoff debacle — and condolences to any of you who do — this is all great fun.

Today it’s the New York Times’ turn. Stung, it would seem, by being called lying extortionists by the Wilpons, Team Trustee provides the Times with some information that, if true, undercuts the Wilpons’ assertions that they were just as duped as anyone else by Bernie Madoff.

This comes in the form of a description of a lawsuit filed against the Wilpons last year by the widow of one of their former employees who lost a ton in their Madoff-invested 401K. In it she alleges that  multiple third parties — in one case the investment bank Merrill Lynch — made clear their concerns to Wilpon and his partner Saul Katz about investing with Madoff, yet they continued to invest with Madoff anyway, putting over 90% of the company’s 401K funs in Madoff securities.  The suit also alleges that Madoff had his own money invested with Wilpon’s company, thereby creating a conflict of interest on the part of the Wilpons when it came to deciding where the 401K money should go and how to invest it.

None of which is to say that the Wilpons were actively involved or even technically complicit in Madoff’s fraud. It’s merely to say that, unlike the other duped investors like Wayne Gretzky or Stephen Spielberg or whoever, the Wilpons were under totally different duties, subject to greater information and more closely-related to Madoff than anyone else who has been dragged into this case so far.  That’s what makes them different. That’s also what has them in the mess they’re in now.

I’m sure that the Daily News will counter this somehow. I’m sure a certain commenter who has been showing up in all the Wilpon threads will either echo those talking points or even have them before the Daily News does (uncanny, that!). Which is cool. All is fair in litigation and war. And, to be honest, I like the little back and forth we’ve been having in the comments section. Keeps everyone active and thinking.

But if the counter punch does come, it had better get a tad more refined. Because the more these allegations stack up — from disparate sources, not just the trustee — the less plausible the “Wilpon was totally blindsided by Madoff” line becomes.

And I’m not buying for a second that the Wilpons are in better shape now that settlement talks have broken down, which some are arguing. That’s simply ludicrous.  That is, unless you believe that having allegations splashed all over The Paper of Record that you screwed a widow out of her $300K retirement fund due to your negligence and conflict of interest to be a good thing. And unless you like your legal fees to shoot through the roof and your potential exposure to go from large-but-finite to “who the hell knows?”

Report: Mets ownership backs Terry Collins

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The Mets entered Sunday night’s game against the Pirates with a disappointing 20-27 record. While the club has dealt with a litany of injuries, manager Terry Collins has also drawn criticism for in-game decision-making, particularly regarding his decision-making.

Owner Fred Wilpon is still Collins’ strongest supporter, however, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports. As a result, the team is unlikely to make a managerial change anytime soon. If the Mets continue to struggle, though, ownership may feel pressured to make a change.

Collins became the longest-tenured manager in Mets history last week. Collins managed the Mets to a 77-85 record in 2011 and has overall helped the club go 501-518, winning the NL Pennant in 2015. He is not signed to a contract beyond this season.

Joe Mauer becomes first Twin to reach base seven times in a game since Rod Carew

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Twins first baseman Joe Mauer had a game for the record books on Sunday against the Rays. He finished 4-for-5 with an RBI double, a solo home run, two singles, and three walks in eight plate appearances. Unfortunately for him, the Twins still lost 8-6 in 15 innings.

ESPN’s Stats & Info notes that Mauer is the first Twin to reach base seven times in one game since Rod Carew in 1972 against the Brewers. The last player to reach base seven times in one game (without the aid of an error) was Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford on August 8 last season against the Marlins. The feat has only been accomplished seven times this decade, so about once a year.

After Sunday’s game, Mauer is batting .283/.363/.408 with three home runs, 18 RBI, and 23 runs scored in 171 plate appearances. Not too shabby.