Does this “man” look like management to you?

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The caped gentleman in the corner of this post is “Champ,” the mascot of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees.  His job: to act like a loon, cause trouble, make kids laugh, make crowds cheer and to do a lot of general good will creation.  The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees, however, allegedly consider him to be an executive of some kind.  At least when it comes to paying overtime:

A Pennsylvania man who worked as the mascot for a New York Yankees minor league team claims his former employer violated worker protection laws.

Brian Bonner was laid off last month from his job as Champ. He’s suing the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees, claiming they improperly classified him as a manager to avoid paying him overtime.

I have no idea, obviously, if there’s anything to this. I do know a lot of people, however, who are now classified as management for jobs that, 20 years ago, were never considered such a thing.

Empowerment or exploitation? I guess the answer to that depends on how managerial you consider doing things like straight clerical or assembly work. Or, you know, shooting t-shirts into crowds with canons and riding ATVs around warning tracks.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. lays out to make a great catch in deep right-center field

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Cubs center fielder Albert Almora, Jr. robbed Giants first baseman Brandon Belt of at least a double in the top of the first inning of Monday’s game at Wrigley Field. Almora completely left his feet to catch the ball before landing just shy of the warning track.

The Giants took the early lead two batters prior to Belt’s at-bat as Joe Panik hit a solo home run to center field.