Mark Cuban is not interested in the Mets or the Dodgers

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There aren’t many sure things in this world, but one sure thing is that whenever a baseball team’s ownership situation is in flux, people will start mentioning Mark Cuban’s name.  This time Cuban is making a preemptive strike:

“I’m not chasing any more baseball teams … “I’ve just come to the conclusion, if I’m going to write a huge check, I’d rather be wooed than have to chase … whether it’s here or the Dodgers, for that matter, I’m not going to put myself in a bidding situation.”

The “here” referred to the Mets.

I get why people always think about Cuban in these situations. He owns a sports franchise already and has expressed interest in at least two baseball teams in the past. But if you believe Wikipedia, there are over 400 billionaires in the United States alone.  Figure there are scores more Chuck Greenberg-types (i.e. mere millionaires who can wrangle together a number of rich investors).  As such, it’s always a smarter bet to pick “the field” before focusing on Cuban.  And that’s before you even figure in baseball’s alleged reluctance to allow Cuban into the ownership club.

No one ever mentions, I dunno, Jerry Yang or George Lucas or Michael Dell or any of the other people scads of money.  Heck, maybe we should start a new category of billionaire rumor-mongering.  That would keep us occupied until spring training starts.

Heard this: Gordon Getty was seen buying a Dodgers cap at an Inglewood gas station yesterday …

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.