Fred McGriff isn’t having the best couple of months

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The Rays fired the Crime Dog!  Or, probably.

According to Marc Topkin of the St. Petersburg Times, the Rays declined to rehire Fred McGriff after the 2010 season for reasons unknown.  He had been working as a special advisor in the community outreach department for a total of four years.

Those roles are usually more celebratory than anything, and his time probably just expired.

But, there’s more bad news on McGriff.

Alexandra Zayas, also of the Times, is reporting that McGriff’s wife Veronica filed for protection against the former ballplayer on January 14, just about three weeks ago.

Veronica McGriff wrote this in the police report:

“I am afraid and scared for my life and well-being.  During the past four months, my husband has been acting very strange. I learned that he secretly forged my signature to transfer our $1-million from a trust. He has stopped talking to me and the only communications he has had with me have been rude, aggressive and violent.”

“I don’t know who he is anymore. … I fear he is going to try to hurt me and I do not feel safe in my home.”

Scary stuff, but it sounds like things have been smoothed over now.  Veronica and Fred agreed to begin marriage counseling on January 31, dismissing the petition and dissolving any potential injunction.  It’s probably not fair to guess, but perhaps the strange behavior was a result of the Rays’ decision to cut McGriff loose.  Whatever the case, things seem to be back on track.

McGriff, now 47, retired after the 2004 season with 493 career home runs and a stellar .284/.377/.509 career batting line.  He was a five-time All-Star and drew MVP votes in eight different seasons.

Sean Manaea pitches first no-hitter of 2018

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea delivered his first career no-hitter against the Red Sox in a decisive 3-0 victory on Saturday night. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea was nearly flawless, holding the Sox to four total baserunners and striking out 10 of 30 batters faced — a career record.

Manaea was gifted a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth inning. While the Red Sox managed to draw two walks off of Manaea, they didn’t come anywhere close to plating a run. Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning with an infield hit down the first base line, but strayed out of bounds and later saw his hit reversed on a call of batter interference.

Entering the ninth inning, the 26-year-old lefty was sitting at just 95 pitches through eight frames of no-hit ball. He quickly deposed Blake Swihart and Mookie Betts with a groundout and fly out, then walked Benintendi on seven pitches. Any threat the Red Sox might have posed was soon eliminated, however, as Hanley Ramirez ground into a force out to complete the no-hitter.

Manaea is the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter was also against an AL West rival, when the Mariners’ Chris Bosio clinched a 2-0 no-no on April 22, 1993. Manaea’s feat is even more outstanding given how dominant the Red Sox have looked this season: prior to Saturday’s defeat, they boasted a 17-2 record and had yet to be shut out during the regular season.