The Mets and Madoff: “Bernie was part of the business plan for the Mets”

46 Comments

Fred Wilpon has insisted since 2008 that the Bernie Madoff mess had little impact on the Mets’ baseball operations.  Even since last week, when it was announced that he would have to sell part of the team due to the Madoff losses, the sense has been that they are exclusively personal losses and that since the team is the Wilpons’ largest asset it was logical that he turn to the team for his capital needs.

There’s an article in today’s New York Times, however, which tells a far different story: Bernie Madoff and his investments were deeply involved in the Mets, and the Mets operations were highly dependent on Bernie Madoff:

When the Mets negotiated their larger contracts with star players — complex deals with signing bonuses and performance incentives — they sometimes adopted the strategy of placing deferred money owed the players with Mr. Madoff’s investment firm. They would have to pay the player, but the owners of the club would be able to make money for themselves in the meantime. There never seemed to be much doubt about that, according to several people with knowledge of the arrangements.

“Bernie was part of the business plan for the Mets,” a former employee of the club said … interviews with current and former associates of Mr. Wilpon and Mr. Katz, as well as former employees of the club, former employees of Mr. Madoff and others, make it clear that the relationship was substantial and that the role Mr. Madoff played in the financial life of the ball club and the Wilpon and Katz families was pervasive.

The more damning part of the article, however, involves the way that the Wilpons would steer friends and even Mets employees to Madoff investments.  Indeed, former Mets GM Frank Cashen says that his deferred compensation package after leaving the Mets was invested with Madoff.  He was paid before the bottom fell out, but he says that Wilpon and Madoff worked “in unison” he says that Wilpon and his partner Saul Katz worked “in unison” to push Mets employees to invest in Madoff securities. That famous Bobby Bonilla deferred money deal was also invested with Madoff.  Madoff also reportedly got many of his investors via introductions from Fred Wilpon, who the bankruptcy trustee suing him alleged knew or should have known that Madoff was a scam artist.

If what the many sources of this article say is true, the Wilpons are more than the victims they’ve made themselves out to be.  They were an important part of Madoff’s operation, whether they themselves knew the nature of the operation or whether they simply placed stupid blind faith in their close friend.

And there is no question that, by virtue of placing team-related investments with Madoff, the financial prospects of the Mets — and not just the Wilpons — was deeply harmed as a result.

No done deal for Jeter and Jeb: Rob Manfred says two groups still in play for the Marlins

Getty Images
Leave a comment

For all of the headlines about Derek Jeter and Jeb Bush buying the Miami Marlins, this is looking like anything but a done deal. First is the small matter of the billion and a half bucks Jeter and Jeb need to put together. Then there’s the matter of there being another . . . mystery bidder!

That according to commissioner Rob Manfred who says two groups are still bidding to buy the Marlins. He said this morning at the groundbreaking for the Jackie Robinson Museum, adding “There is no agreement in place. We’re working with more than one group . . . there is not a signed document on any topic.”

Despite this, Manfred said that “the timeline is relatively short; it would be measured in days, not months.” So someone is likely to find that billion and a half bucks soon, I reckon.

Red Sox prospect involved in serious auto accident

2 Comments

Via WEEI.com comes a report that Red Sox minor league pitcher Kevin Steen was critically injured in a car crash on Wednesday night near Fort Myers.

The driver of the other car involved in the accident was killed. Steen is in the hospital in critical condition. It appears as though the other driver veered off the road, overcorrected and then crossed the center line, crashing into Steen’s SUV.

Steen, 20, is a starting pitcher. He was a ninth round pick of the Red Sox in 2014 out of Oak Ridge High School in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He’s played three seasons in the Sox season and was about to begin his fourth.