Great moments in provocation: the Giants take their trophy to San Jose

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Bruce Newman of the San Jose Mercury News has a column today about the Giants bringing their World Series trophy for display in San Jose.  According to Newman This Means Something. This is Important:

On Tuesday, the Giants brought their precious metal mantelpiece to San Jose to mark their territorial rights in the most public way possible. Standing 24 inches high and 11 inches in diameter, the trophy looked like what you might get if you asked Tiffany to design a gaudy fire hydrant … If there was any doubt that the Giants will dig in their heels to protect their territory, managing partner Bill Neukom made the trip down to the South Bay to put it to rest. “This county is the heart of our marketplace,” Neukom said. Then he got on the public address system and told the fans the trophy was really theirs.

I guess that means the Giants taking the trophy to Sacramento, Modesto, New York, Monterey and the couple dozen other places they’re going with it means that the Giants are the most expansionist, territory-claiming group of people since Napoleon.

Look, I’m totally sympathetic to the whole A’s-to-San Jose movement, and I know the Mercury-News has been strongly advocating for it for a long time.  But really: sometimes a goodwill tour is just a goodwill tour.  It’s not a shot across anyone’s bow.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.