Troy Glaus may sit out this season


The winter has been a bit rude to free agent first baseman Troy Glaus.

The 34-year-old drew mild interest from the Rockies in early December, but talks never went anywhere and he wasn’t linked to another club the rest of the way.  Now, according to Ken Rosenthal of, he is considering retirement.  Or at least sitting out for the 2011 season.

Glaus posted a decent .240/.344/.400 overall batting line, 17 home runs and 71 RBI across 128 games in 2010, but he had a horrible second half and clubs are probably worried that whatever was plaguing him in August, September and October of last season will carry over into 2011.  Plus, his limited range defensively has made him useful at only one position.

Here’s his agent, Mike Nicotera:

“Troy had opportunities to sign with more than one club this offseason and each time he was presented with a particular opportunity, he weighed it against spending more time with his wife and family.  After a good deal of thought and discussion in each instance, he decided to pass on playing.”

He could decide to look for offers mid-summer, when teams might be dealing with injuries or simply looking to add depth.  Glaus still has some amount of power potential.

Video: Braden Halladay pays homage to Roy Halladay in spring game

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While newly-acquired talent Danny Espinosa was off collecting hits for the Blue Jays against the Orioles, Marcus Stroman led a youth-filled roster against the Canadian Junior National Team in a split-squad game on Saturday. In the eighth inning, 17-year-old Canadian pitcher Braden Halladay took the mound to honor his late father’s memory against his former team.

Halladay accomplished just that, wielding a fastball that topped out in the low-80s and setting down a perfect 1-2-3 inning against the top of the lineup. No one batter saw more than a single pitch from the right-hander: Mc Gregory Contreras and Mattingly Romanin flew out to the outfield corners and Bo Bichette laid down a ground ball for an easy third out.’s Gregor Chisholm has a fantastic profile of the high school junior, including his approach to the game and his attempt to do Roy Halladay proud while carving out his own path to the majors. “From a pitching standpoint, it was everything I could have asked for and more,” Halladay told reporters. “Especially now, every time I make mistakes, I still hear him drilling me about them in my head, just because he’s done it so many times before. From a mind-set standpoint, I don’t think with any bias that I could have had a better teacher.”