Yankees President Randy Levine blasts Rangers Owner Chuck Greenberg

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Remember earlier this week when Chuck Greenberg said that he thinks the Rangers’ visit to Cliff Lee’s home in Arkansas contributed to Lee signing with Philly instead of the Yankees?  Yeah, Yankees President Randy Levine didn’t much care for that:

“If he really wants to impress us then he can get the Rangers off of welfare and show how they can be revenue-sharing payors, rather than recipients for three years in row, without financing from Major League Baseball. That would really be something … I think Chuck is delusional.  He’s been in the game a few minutes but it seems to be that he thinks he knows what everybody else is thinking. He should really let Cliff Lee speak for himself.”

I’m struggling to think why Greenberg’s comments — however silly they might have been — would have upset Levine so much.  They weren’t directed at the Yankees. They were just musings. All I can guess is that Levine in no way wants anyone to suggest that the Yankees had a real shot at Lee. That the Phillies’ signing of him was occasioned by fate as opposed to the intervention of the Rangers or the failures of the Yankees. Maybe he struck a nerve.

And what’s with the stuff about revenue sharing?  I can’t help but think that Levine is going to get a call from Selig over that.  Levine may not like it, but revenue sharing is part of baseball’s architecture. It is designed to aid teams that were not, like Levine’s Yankees, blessed with a monopoly over the largest media market in the country. An effort, however insufficient it is in practice, to help teams not as fortunate as the Yankees to compete on something approximating an equal footing.

And really: given how tied up Randy Levine was in securing over a billion dollars in tax exempt bonds for the construction of Yankee Stadium — and how defensive he was about it when people called the Yankees out on that — he’s the last dude who should be complaining about welfare.

I don’t think Major League Baseball will appreciate revenue sharing being referred to as “welfare.”  And even if they don’t mind that term, I don’t think Selig will take kindly to Levine blasting revenue sharing recipients any more than we would take to some rich guy who inherited family money blasting a poor person for accepting welfare when they need it.

Giants remove pitching coach Dave Righetti

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After 18 years, 12 winning seasons, seven postseason runs and three World Championships, Dave Righetti is no longer a pitching coach for the Giants. He was removed from his post on Saturday, when the team announced a few reassignments as they shake up their coaching staff. Heading into the 2018 season, Righetti will serve as special assistant to general manager Bobby Evans, former bullpen coach Mark Gardner will step into a similar special assistant role to “assist in pitching evaluations,” and former assistant hitting coach Steve Decker will take a special assistant role in baseball operations.

According to MLB.com’s Chris Haft, Righetti was the longest-tenured pitching coach in the big leagues. He helped shape the careers of notable Giants’ aces like Madison Bumgarner, Tim Lincecum and Matt Cain — all Cy Young contenders (and, in Lincecum’s case, a two-time winner) at various points in their careers. He was there to assist Ryan Vogelsong during his stunning mid-career comeback in San Francisco. He helped newcomers like Chris Stratton and Ty Blach flourish even as the team stumbled to the bottom of the division. He was there to take the credit when a sterling rotation clinched the Giants’ 56-year, drought-snapping championship title in 2010 — and, when things went so horribly south in 2017, he took the blame as well.

Hardly anything went right for the Giants’ pitching staff in 2017. Madison Bumgarner was shelved after sustaining a serious shoulder injury in a dirt bike accident, Johnny Cueto couldn’t shake a cluster of blisters on his right hand and Mark Melancon found it difficult to justify a $62 million paycheck after pitching through an arm injury to four blown losses/saves and a 4.50 ERA. It would be a lot for any pitching coach to stay on top of, and given the team’s rapid descent from 2016 postseason contenders to last-place finishers in 2017, it’s not surprising that Evans felt the need to switch things up.

Successors have yet to be named for Righetti, Gardner or Decker, though Murray hears that the Giants could have interest in former major league pitching coach Jim Hickey. NBC Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic adds that Evans is searching for someone to “put a new voice” on the pitching staff and will likely target someone who, like Righetti, brings considerable experience to the role.