Prosecutors are worried about Roger Clemens’ lawyer

5 Comments

The Roger Clemens prosecutors are asking the judge to grill Clemens to make sure he’s aware that his attorney — Rusty Hardin — may have a conflict of interest in that Hardin briefly represented Andy Pettitte back when the Mitchell Report came out.  My assumption is that the prosecutors are trying to make sure that, if they get a conviction, Clemens can’t later appeal on the ground that his lawyer was unable to effectively cross-examine Pettitte, who will likely be a major witness against him at trial.

I’m fairly certain that Clemens is well-aware of this potential conflict, what with the fact that Brian McNamee’s lawyer had tried to disqualify Hardin from representing Clemens in the defamation case down in Texas nearly three years ago.  Motions were filed and a decision issued with the judge saying that there was no problem with Hardin cross-examining Pettitte. At least as long as Pettitte himself didn’t object to it.  It’s Pettitte’s confidences with Hardin that would potentially be at risk, after all. He’s the one who would be damaged the most.  And to date he hasn’t cared.

And probably for good reason:  Hardin represented Pettitte for something like four whole days around the time the Mitchell Report was released, during which only a couple of conversations were had.  Pettitte didn’t like Hardin’s strategy so he left him, hired competent counsel and hasn’t really looked back.  Since then, Pettitte has testified in depositions and in Congressional hearings, all of which Hardin was part of.  Really, if there is anything left unexplored in the Pettitte-Hardin relationship, it’s not worth exploring.

And now, unlike the player who stuck with Hardin, the biggest problem that Andy Pettitte has is deciding whether to accept an eight figure deal to play baseball in 2011 or to stay home in his mansion with his adoring family.

Frankly, I imagine he’s just fine with the present circumstances.

Who is the fastest sprinter in baseball?

Getty Images
2 Comments

We’re not talking the 100 meters here. We’re talking practical baseball sprinting. That’s defined by the StatCast folks at MLB as “feet per second in a player’s fastest one-second window,” while sprinting for the purposes of, you know, winning a baseball game.

StatCast ranked all players who have at least 10 “max effort” runs this year. I won’t give away who is at the top of this list, but given that baseball’s speedsters tend to get a lot of press you will not be at all surprised. As for the bottom of the list, well, the Angels don’t pay Albert Pujols to run even when he’s not suffering from late career chronic foot problems, so they’ll probably let that one go. I will say, however, that I am amused that the third slowest dude in baseball is named “Jett,” however.

Lately people have noticed some odd things about home run distances on StatCast, suggesting that maybe their metrics are wacko. And, of course, their means of gauging this stuff is proprietary and opaque, so we have no way of knowing if their numbers are off the reservation or not. As such, take all of the StatCast stuff you see with a grain of salt.

That said, even if the feet-per-second stuff is wrong here, knowing that Smith is faster than Jones by a factor of X is still interesting.

Here are the final All-Star voting results before the close of balloting

Getty Images
4 Comments

All-Star voting ends this Thursday night, just before midnight eastern time. The All-Star teams — at least how they’ll appear before the dozen or two substitutions we’ll get before the game — will be unveiled on Sunday at 7pm on ESPN, just before Sunday Night Baseball.

Which means you still have time to alter these standings, which now stand as the final update before things are set in, well, not stone, but at least some Play-Doh which has been left out of the can too long and is kinda hard to mess with.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE