There’s a lot more going on during a televised baseball game than you realize

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Friend of HBT Caryn Rose — of  Metsgrrl fame — went to an event called “Art of Televised Baseball” last night, where the main attraction was SNY’s Bill Webb talking about how baseball games are produced for TV.  Lots of fun insider stuff about the decisions Webb — the director of some 145 Mets games a year — makes in order to get the product you see on the screen. Among them:

  • When Keith is laughing and there’s nothing going on in the booth that’s funny, it’s because Webb is saying something to him in his earpiece. He told the story of the time Ralph Kiner sneezed, and Webb said “Gesundheit” and Ralph said “Thank you” on air.
  • [Webb] Mentioned both David Wells’ perfect game and David Cone’s perfect game as two of his most memorable ones. Someone then asked how he changed his coverage during a perfect game and he first said that he didn’t, but that he made sure that low 3rd, low 1st and CF cameras were always covering the pitcher so that if he blew it, the pitcher would be facing the camera.

It’s so easy to let a game wash over you when you watch it on TV. Then you realize that, as you’re sitting there, some guy in a production truck is changing the camera angles, putting up graphics and otherwise barking out orders every five or six seconds for three hours so that you can get your fix.

Good stuff. Tons and tons more of Webb’s observations are passed along. Nice writeup from Caryn. Check it out.

Report: Shohei Ohtani has sprained UCL in pitching elbow

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The Angels signed Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani for a $2.3 million signing bonus last weekend. They may have damaged goods on their hands. Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports reports that Ohtani underwent a physical that revealed a first-degree sprain of his ulnar collateral ligament. As a result, he got a platelet-rich plasma injection on October 20. This was made known to teams after Ohtani entered MLB’s posting system, so it wasn’t like the Angels went into this blind.

Ohtani’s report said, “Although partial damage of UCL in deep layer of his right UCL exists, he is able to continue full baseball participation with sufficient elbow care program.” It also said Ohtani “will most likely be available to start his throwing program approximately a month from the PRP.”

Passan notes that the report also mentioned that a “small free body” floats in Ohtani’s elbow near his UCL.

Ohtani isn’t without other injuries. He battled hamstring and ankle issues throughout 2017 and underwent right ankle surgery back in October. Thankfully for the Angels, this diagnosis is about as good as it could be considering the circumstances. However, if Ohtani does exacerbate his UCL issue, he may ultimately need Tommy John surgery at some point, which would take him out of action for at least a year.