Cleveland Indians v Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

Tired of standing still, Angels take step backwards

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Having struck out all winter, the Angels finally did something to shake up their lineup Friday, only the move was to get rid of one of their best hitters. 

Opinions on Mike Napoli’s defense are certainly mixed, but there aren’t many better offensive catchers.   Since he entered the league in 2006, Napoli has hit .251/.346/.455 with 92 homers in 1,549 at-bats.   Over the last three years, he’s come in at .258/.341/.502.  Only two catchers with at least 1,000 plate appearances since 2008 stack up better when it comes to OPS+:

1. Joe Mauer – 147
2. Brian McCann – 126
3. Napoli – 123
4. Victor Martinez – 117
5. Jorge Posada – 117

And it’s not like the Angels have a whole bunch of expendable offense. They ranked ninth in the AL in runs scored last season. They had five above average hitters last season, counting the 51 games they got from Kendry Morales. They’ll likely have a full season from Morales this year, but now Napoli and Hideki Matsui are gone and the other two productive players, Torii Hunter and Bobby Abreu, are turning 35 and 37, respectively.

Napoli’s departure means one of baseball’s worst hitters — arguably the worst — will move into the starting lineup on a regular basis. It might be merely a temporary promotion for Jeff Mathis, as the team has a decent alternative in Bobby Wilson and a top prospect on the way in Hank Conger, but Mike Scioscia loves his defense and won’t need much convincing to give him 400 at-bats for the first time.

And that’s just not something the Angels can afford at the moment. Morales and Hunter should be good, but probably not great. Abreu is drifting back towards average, and Juan Rivera and Alberto Callaspo aren’t anything more than that. The Angels will go get themselves a DH before Opening Day, and they might yet pull off an upgrade at third base, though there’s no help in free agency there.

Scioscia definitely seems to have his work cut out for him now. Yet this is what he wanted: he may have had nothing to do with the trade itself, but in choosing to put so much faith in Mathis, he steered Napoli out of town just the same.

Braves sign former football player Sanders Commings

GLENDALE, AZ - AUGUST 15:  Cornerback Sanders Commings #26 of the Kansas City Chiefs on the sidelines during the pre-season NFL game against the Arizona Cardinals at the University of Phoenix Stadium on August 15, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
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The Braves have signed former football player and current outfielder Sanders Commings, an Augusta, Georgia native, to a minor league contract, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports.

Commings, 26, was a defensive back who played for the University of Georgia before being selected by the Chiefs in the fifth round of the 2013 draft. He appeared in two games in the 2013 season.

Commings also played baseball for Westside High School and was selected by the Diamondbacks in the 37th round of the 2008 draft. He chose to attend the University of Georgia instead. When football didn’t pan out, Commings started training with Jerry Hairston, Jr. Hairston said he was “blown away” when he saw Commings hit for the first time.

Obviously, Commings’ path to success as a professional baseball player will be long, but it’s a no-risk flier for the Braves. The club has past experience with football players, including Deion Sanders and Brian Jordan.

The next task for the Braves will be to acquire Ryan Goins from the Blue Jays. That way, players will look at the lineup card each day to see if it’s Commings or Goins.

Justin Verlander: “I’d like to see the AL and NL have the same rules… I vote NL rules.”

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 10:  Starting pitcher Justin Verlander #35 of the Detroit Tigers pitches against the Seattle Mariners in the first inning at Safeco Field on August 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
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On Thursday afternoon, Rays pitcher Chris Archer asked his Twitter followers, “Lots swirling around what needs to be changed about the game of baseball. What do y’all want to see changed, if anything, & why?”

Tigers ace Justin Verlander responded:

To that, Archer said:

For what it’s worth, Verlander hasn’t been much of a hitter. In 47 career plate appearances, he has three singles and no extra-base hits. And if the AL did get rid of the DH rule, the Tigers would have nowhere to put Victor Martinez. Verlander, though, would have an easier time pitching to opposing pitchers rather than their DH’s.