Some more (and better) words about scoops

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Yesterday I wrote about scoops regarding player transactions and the like, offering my somewhat rambling take on it all.

Today Geoff Baker of the Seattle Times has his own take, and it’s much better informed and, frankly, a lot more interesting than mine:

Readers don’t go online to read Rosenthal and Heyman for the latest in-depth, investigative feature about their particular teams. But for breaking stuff around the game of baseball, those guys are really good at it. And they’ve both done the newspaper thing — beat writing, column writing — extremely well in the past. This is just a different gig for them. And one their websites care dearly about.

Newspapers? Sure, they love to be first. But these days, more and more emphasis is being placed on getting it right.

There’s a lot more to that, including a fun anecdote which explains why I didn’t see Baker with all of us degenerates at the hotel bar during the Winter Meetings for the past couple of years.

If you’re at all interested in what people in baseball media think about baseball media, by all means, check Geoff’s take out. And yes, I promise: no more meta-content about blogging and baseball writing and stuff today.  I know it gets old for some of you.

UPDATE: I lied. One more media thing: Michael S. Schmidt of the New York Times — who gets his share of scoops and has been the subject of some of my snark from time to time — is leaving the sports beat and will soon begin covering Iraq for the New York Times.  Wow. That’s a far cry from baseball.  Good luck, Michael, and keep your head down.

Jose Reyes is hitless in 20 plate appearances to start the season

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Mets backup infielder Jose Reyes pinch-hit and popped up in the top of the eighth inning of Thursday night’s game in Atlanta against the Braves. That ran his streak up to 20 consecutive hitless plate appearances to start the 2018 season. He has reached base once, however, on a walk, so there’s that.

Reyes, 34, signed a one-year, $2 million contract with the Mets near the end of January. At the time, the Mets hadn’t yet signed Todd Frazier, so Reyes was in the mix to contribute as a utilityman but he has operated as a bat off the bench for the most part this season.

One wonders how much longer the Mets are going to let Reyes flounder. According to FanGraphs, he has already been worth a half-win less than a replacement-level player. Only eight other players have been as bad or worse this season.