Hey! A ranking in which the Mets are number one!

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And it’s not even a list of dubious achievements!

I’m no Mets fan, but I have always loved this logo: the distinctive dark skyline, the white bridge symbolizing the five boroughs, the classic Mets script, the terrific color scheme of orange and blue. My only suggestion: Mr. Met should have it tattooed around his whole head.

That’s Jim Caple, ranking the MLB team logos, with the Metropolitans in the top spot.  I have to agree, it’s a choice logo. It’s satisfying on a number of levels and I’ve always loved it, alternating between it and the Dodgers logo as being the best (Jim as the Dodgers at #4).

I also agree with his last place pick — the Indians — because Chief Wahoo is probably the worst thing there is of all baseball-related things, including the kiss-cam, “Cotton-eyed Joe” and fouling balls off your instep and having it ricochet into your athletic supporter.

In between there’s great room for debate.  Fun column.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”