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Shane Victorino and Charlie Manuel aren’t seeing eye-to-eye

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There’s a story in today’s Philadelphia Daily News about Shane Victorino and how he might bounce back from a relatively down 2010.  Charlie Manuel thinks its a matter of focus:

“First of all, I think he got a little bit more home-run happy. That might have had something to do with it. But also, I think it might have been the fact that we’ve been successful. We’ve won games and went to a couple World Series. It might be a relaxation thing or something like that.

“He just didn’t stay focused as much as he usually does. We talk about consistency. Every time we have a meeting, [we say] the game is about staying focused. They say, ‘Oh, there’s nothing wrong with us and we’ll win tomorrow. We’ll get ’em a couple days from now or next week or whatever.’ I think, sometimes, when you get secure, you get relaxed. It’s not like you mean to do that. It’s just kind of human nature. And all of a sudden you’ve got to be woken up to how you’re supposed to play.

It’s hard. You’ve heard me say we’re getting too complacent or we’re getting relaxed, this and that. But you go tell somebody that and he acts like he don’t see that. Being around as long as I have, in a way, I kind of understand that. But, at the same time, you have to back up and take inventory of yourself and be honest with yourself.”

Except Victorino doesn’t seem to want to buy into it:

“People try to use that as an answer. Why did guys struggle? Oh, because they’re comfortable. Charlie used that word complacent. I don’t know. My definition of complacent may be different than Charlie’s. Our team, I don’t think, ever gets complacent. It’s not us. It’s not our nature. It’s not the way we are,” he said.

“I absolutely understand why people would say that. But you look in our clubhouse. There’s no way our demeanor has changed. Our hunger is just the same. We ended up with 97 wins, the best record in baseball. In our defense, there’s no way you can say our team let up because of multiyear deals or because of big contracts. There are a lot of expectations and a lot of hunger. There are a lot of guys who want to turn things around and show people they’re still on the map from the offensive side.”

Interesting. Victorino goes on to talk about his down year being a matter of mechanics. Manuel, the former hitting coach, thinks it’s focus.  One would think that Manuel would go with mechanics too rather than imply that Victorino wasn’t mentally prepared.  But he didn’t. Why might he not?

Is the bad mechanics explanation simply not plausible? Maybe, and given that Manuel is not one who engages in b.s., perhaps he’s not willing to give a nod to an excuse. But if Victorino’s problem truly was one of focus, was it something Manuel missed as it was happening or something that was pointed out yet went unheeded by Victorino at the time?

Just a strange situation all around. While Phillies fans may have a better recollection on this than me, I can’t recall Manuel ever calling out a player, even mildly like this. Which leads me to believe that, in this case, he considers it a serious matter.

What’s goin’ on?

Report: Teams have inquired with the Angels about Hector Santiago

ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 20:  Hector Santiago #53 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches during the first inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers  at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 20, 2016 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reported on Monday that the Angels have received inquiries from multiple teams concerning starter Hector Santiago. He adds that the club is willing to listen to offers. Jon Morosi of FOX Sports and MLB Network reports that the Marlins are among the teams that have inquired.

Santiago, 28, has pitched to a 4.32 ERA with 96 strikeouts and 47 walks in 110 1/3 innings. Sabermetric statistics such as FIP, xFIP, and SIERA think the lefty has pitched even worse than his ERA indicates however, pitting 2016 as his worst performance to date.

Santiago is earning $5 million this season and will enter his third and final year of arbitration eligibility going into 2017.

We also learned earlier that, in an effort to bolster their starting rotation, the Marlins have also shown interest in Wade Miley of the Mariners and Jeremy Hellickson of the Phillies.

Prince Fielder will undergo season-ending neck surgery this week

SEATTLE, WA - JUNE 10: Prince Fielder #84 takes a swing during a game against the Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field on June 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington. The Mariners won the game 7-5. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
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The Rangers placed DH Prince Fielder on the disabled list last week due to more neck discomfort. On Friday, Fielder met with Dr. Drew Dossett, who performed spinal fusion surgery on Fielder in 2014 for a herniated disk in his neck. Dossett has recommended another procedure, so Fielder will undergo season-ending surgery this week, Jeff Wilson of the Fort-Worth Star Telegram reports.

Fielder was having a rough season, batting .212/.292/.334 with eight home runs and 44 RBI in 370 plate appearances. He played in only 42 games in 2014, but returned in 2015 looking more like his old self. Unfortunately, neck and back issues are notoriously difficult to fix. Hopefully, this upcoming procedure does the trick for Fielder.

Fielder is owed $24 million per season through 2020, with the Tigers paying $6 million of it per season.