Cashman vs. the Yankees front office: here we go

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As expected, Brian Cashman’s “I didn’t want Rafael Soriano” press conference has led to chatter about the State of the Yankees front office. Danny Knobler has some anonymice talking to him:

Some people within the organization were telling friends that the divide between Cashman and the team’s Tampa operation is growing again, and even that ownership wasn’t happy with some of Cashman’s recent moves. Last winter, Cashman traded for Javier Vazquez and signed Nick Johnson and Randy Winn as free agents, and none of those moves worked out well. There was even talk that Cashman had mishandled the Lee negotiations by showing too much patience, rather than pushing to get a deal done quickly.

Of course second guessing is an easy game and there are two sides to every story. If the front office was willing to step in to sign Soriano now, why wouldn’t they have stepped in to block the Javier Vazquez trade or the Nick Johnson signing last year if they hated those deals so much?  And while it’s theoretically possible that an early, overwhelming offer to Cliff Lee may have changed things, almost everything that was being reported about Lee back in November and December was that he wanted to take things slowly.

I still maintain that the Soriano signing is not, in and of itself, a worrisome thing as it relates to Cashman’s actual power. Owners overrule GMs all the time. But Cashman’s surprising candor on the topic has certainly emboldened people in the organization to start airing the dirty laundry. And that — more than any one signing — is the kind of thing that can kill someone in New York.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.