Adrian Gonzalez working hard at rehabbing his shoulder. At Petco Park.

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Buster Olney has a good column up today about Adrian Gonzalez’s focus and hard work as he rehabs his shoulder this winter and prepares for the big expectations facing him in Boston this season.  But this stuck out at me:

Gonzalez, a left-handed hitter who throws with his left hand, hurt his right shoulder last year, and he could have tried to go into the 2011 season without surgery. But he hated how the injury restricted what he could do on defense last season, how it prevented him from diving for balls to his right. So he had the surgery after the season, and three days a week this offseason, he has been going to Petco Park to work with Rick Stauffer, the team’s physical therapist, and trainer Todd Hutcheson.

Shortly after Gonzalez was traded — a move that was viewed as inevitable within the Padres’ organization — Gonzalez arrived at Petco Park for his next rehab session, and there was some talk about the deal. But not much. Stauffer just went about his work with Gonzalez, driving his thumbs into the right shoulder to manipulate the tissue, stretching, strengthening.

Do players who get traded typically still use their old team’s trainers and facilities?  I mean, yes, the Padres were his team when he had the surgery so it makes sense that they’d oversee his rehab too. And of course, Gonzalez lives in San Diego.  But it seems strange to me that the Padres would use their resources on another team’s player and that another team would leave their starting first baseman’s rehab to another team.

Not criticizing the move necessarily — it seems pretty efficient, actually, and I imagine that if it were unusual Olney would make some mention of it — but I was rather surprised by it.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.