Let’s not convict Milton Bradley in the court of public opinion just yet


As reported last night, Milton Bradley is in some big-time legal trouble as a result of allegedly making threats of bodily harm and/or death against an unidentified female. The charges under California Penal Code section 422 are felony charges, and if they are borne out, he could end up doing time.

It’s important to remember, however, that the law Bradley is charged with violating carries a subjective element. Specifically, the victim had to have taken the threat seriously at the time and had to have been placed “in sustained fear for his or her own safety or for his or her immediate family’s safety.”

We have no idea about the facts of this case and in no way am I either doubting or buying his accuser’s allegations. However, because of the subjectivity of it — because it relies on the victim’s own words about what she felt at a specific time as opposed to eyewitness accounts or evidence of physical harm —  it’s a law that can lend itself to specious claims more easily than others. If this were merely a case of Milton Bradley rolling his eyes at someone and breezily saying “One of these days, Alice, bang-zoom, to the moon!” I’m assuming that the police would not have made an arrest. And of course, Milton Bradley has a long and colorful history with anger management issues.

That said, despite his personal history, let’s give Bradley the benefit of the doubt before convicting him in the court of public opinion, OK?  We simply don’t know enough at this time to say anything intelligent about the merits of the claim. Really, we don’t know anything.

The Marlins are using Jose Fernandez’s death to head off criticism of their teardown

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There are certain facts about the Miami Marlins that are basic and clear. Among them:

  • Jose Fernandez died in September of 2016;
  • Marlins owner Jeffery Loria, who was by all accounts very close to Jose Fernandez, took it hard;
  • Despite losing the ace who was supposed to anchor the staff for years to come, Loria decided against a teardown that offseason because there was a lot of talent on the roster and trying to patch holes and compete made sense to him;
  • During the ensuing offseason, the Marlins signed a number of players;
  • Those players failed or got hurt and now the Marlins are engaged in a total rebuild and have traded away players in an effort to slash payroll.

Those things cannot be disputed. Nevertheless, I do not think it’s unfair to say that this framing off all of those facts, via anonymous sources speaking to Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald, is totally bogus:

The death of pitching ace Jose Fernandez in 2016 triggered a series of costly roster decisions that the Marlins’ new owners are having to contend with now.

There is no shortage of ‘what ifs’ with how it all played out.

But this much is clear: according to sources with knowledge of internal discussions at the time, a number of players with prohibitive salaries wouldn’t be on the Marlins now if previous owner Jeffrey Loria had listened to the advice of his top baseball people back then.

These “top baseball people” are mostly still with the Marlins, including president of baseball operations Michael Hill, so it’s impossible to separate the historical account of this from present day spin. Which is to say that this article is, without question, fueled by Marlins officials looking to deflect fan anger at their decisions this offseason by holding up the tragic death of Jose Fernandez as a shield against criticism.

“Hey, we know you don’t like that we traded away our best players and continue to look to slash talent,” they are basically saying, “but, please, blame God and fate and Jose Fernandez’s poor decisions and Jeff Loria’s emotions and anything else! Do not blame the baseball operations department of the Miami Marlins!”

It’s emotionally manipulative crap, and whoever supplied this line to Spencer ought to be ashamed of himself.

The emotional components aside, whatever the advice these sources gave to Loria at the time about the need to rebuild then and to not sign players heading into 2017, it was rejected. Once that occurred, like all subordinates, they were required to go out and make good decisions with their overarching marching orders. To the extent they are claiming that extending Martin Prado, signing Edinson Volquez, Brad Ziegler and Junichi Tazawa and trading for Dan Straily were bad moves, they hold responsibility for that too. Loria was a lot of things, but he was not out there handling the day-to-day transactions. If the Marlins signed bad players to bad contracts, the people now looking to be excused of that hold a great deal of responsibility.

Even if we put THAT aside this is a crap line of reasoning. Spencer clearly notes that the idea to give Martin Prado his three-year, $40 million extension was agreed to in principle before Fernandez’s death, even if it was officially signed after. For another, Volquez only cost the Marlins $9 million last year, which should not be bank-breaking for an average pitcher, which Volquez basically was before his injury. He’s on the hook for $13 million this year, much of it presumably covered by insurance. Ziegler and Tazawa are owed a combined $16 million. Given the injuries and ineffectiveness of these guys, no, they are not good contracts, but they also amount to less than $30 million in commitments, again, offset by insurance. They should not break the back of a competently-run organization, even if it’s a low revenue one like the Marlins.

I get it, Marlins executives: you’ve got new bosses who have mandated that you slash payroll. You’ve caught all kinds of hell for it and no one likes catching hell. But (a) the mandate has way, way, way more to do with the new owners’ debt service obligations from their highly-leveraged acquisition of the team than it does the death of Jose Fernandez; and (b) the decisions you made in the wake of Fernandez’s death are your responsibility and you don’t get off the hook for them by making an emotionally manipulative appeal.

Do better, guys. This is pathetic even by the historically pathetic standards of the Miami Marlins.