The Mets sign Chris Young

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They were “closing in on a deal” late yesterday afternoon, but now the deal is reportedly done: Chris Young has agreed to a deal with the Mets. The deal is pending a physical, which is pretty key here given Young’s shoulder troubles last season.

Young is worth a gamble as long as he’s not pricey, which he shouldn’t be. If he pitches well he could hang around and solidify the rotation. Or he could be dealt at the deadline for some foundational pieces. No real downside here. And then there’s this from Adam Rubin’s column yesterday:

The 6-foot-10 Young played basketball and baseball at Princeton. Capuano was Phi Beta Kappa at Duke. Dickey was an English major at the University of Tennessee and is extremely well-read. Left-handed reliever Taylor Tankersley is also known as an intellectual, and his father is a nuclear physicist.

How much you want to bet that if the Mets start the season out poorly the talk radio and tabloid guys go on a big anti-intellectualism kick?  I bet they have interns combing Bill Plaschke’s old anti-Paul DePodesta columns for material as we speak. I just hope that they update the slide rule references to graphing calculators or something. You know, to keep it fresh.

Joe Maddon ejected in eighth inning of NLCS Game 4 after umpires overturn a Wade Davis strikeout

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Cubs manager Joe Maddon was once again ejected from an NLCS game, this time in Game 4.

In the top of the eighth inning, closer Wade Davis found himself in a bit of a pickle. He gave up a leadoff home run to Justin Turner, cutting the Cubs’ lead to 3-2. Davis then walked Yasiel Puig. He was able to get Andre Ethier to pop up, bringing up Curtis Granderson. Granderson worked the count 2-2, then fouled off a pitch. And then he appeared to swing through a curve that bounced in the dirt. Catcher Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out, but Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, so it was a foul ball.

Wolf conferred with the other umpires. After a brief delay, the strikeout was overturned and Granderson was given new life in the batter’s box. Only… replays showed that Wolf got it right the first time.

Understandably, Maddon was livid. On the broadcast, one could see Maddon gesturing to the umpires to look at the replay on the video board behind the stands in left field. The argument fell on deaf ears and he was ejected. Thankfully for the Cubs, justice prevailed and Davis struck out Granderson on the next pitch.

It’ll be interesting to see if Maddon makes any political comparisons after the game. He likened the slide rule, the impetus behind his Game 1 ejection, to the soda tax.