So, what would it take for the Angels to trade for Evan Longoria?

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Sam Miller over at the OC Register is fed up with the same thing I get fed up with from time to time: people proposing truly dumb trades. They usually take the form of a reader suggesting that their rooting interest trade for Stud Player X, while giving up … nothing. Or close to it.  It’s just silly myopia.  Unlike me, however, Sam has decided that he can no longer suffer these fools gladly:

Once a month or so, somebody posts a comment around here suggesting the Angels should trade for Evan Longoria. It’s not just here — at Halos Heaven, HuskerHalo suggested it as “a very nice dream,” and Matt 92310 admitted it’s “perhaps crazy” but wondered “is it unrealistic” that the Angels could trade for him?

I usually think: You’re CRAZY! It would take a package of, like, Mike Trout and Jered Weaver and Hank Conger to get Longoria. Turns out: I’m CRAZY too . It would take even more.

Sam then proceeds to break down exactly how valuable Evan Longoria is and what exactly it would take to land him.  It’s not perfect — there are a lot of assumptions in there — but it’s way closer to the approach a front office would take than the approach all of the armchair GMs out there take.

Instructive stuff for hot stove season.

Rays trade Jake Odorizzi to Twins

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The Rays have traded right-hander Jake Odorizzi to the Twins, per team announcements on Saturday evening. The Twins will receive minor league shortstop Jermaine Palacios in the deal. Despite previous speculation, recently-DFA’d outfielder Corey Dickerson was not included in the trade.

With Odorizzi, the Twins finally have the front-end starter they’ve been seeking all winter. It’s a bargain deal as well, as the 27-year-old righty is under contract through 2019 and didn’t require the club to part with any of their top-shelf prospects in the trade. Odorizzi will be looking to stage a comeback in 2018 after a dismal performance with the Rays last year, during which he eked out a career-worst 4.14 ERA, 3.8 BB/9 and 8.0 SO/9 through 143 1/3 innings.

Palacios, 21, ranked no. 27 in the Twins’ system last season. He split his year between Single-A Cedar Rapids and High-A Fort Myers, raking a combined .296/.333/.454 with 13 home runs and 20 stolen bases in 539 plate appearances. He’s expected to continue developing at shortstop, though he’s also seen limited time at second and third base during his four-year career in the minors.