So apparently Hall of Fame voters have a “sacred responsibility” to keep the place “clean and pure”

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Jim Reeves of ESPN Dallas would like to let you know how important his Hall of Fame vote is:

Judge and jury? Moral compasses? Gatekeepers? Yeah, maybe so, because that’s the responsibility we accept when we qualify to become a Hall of Fame voter. Because of the steroids issue, it’s a responsibility that has become so charged with controversy, I have even considered rejecting that honor and asking that my name be taken off the rolls as an active voter. It was a difficult and often agonizing challenge before the steroids era descended upon us. You can only imagine what it’s like now.

But I haven’t quit as a voter—not yet, anyway—because I consider it a sacred responsibility to the great players of the past to keep their exclusive club as clean and pure as possible. And yes, I say that with full knowledge that there are already a few in there with questionable credentials and backgrounds. All I can do is the best that I can. I owe that to late greats such as Joe DiMaggio and Lou Gehrig, Eddie Matthews and Roberto Clemente. I owe it to Nolan Ryan and Fergie Jenkins, to Alomar and Blyleven.

That would be the same Fergie Jenkins who got busted for trying to get cocaine, hashish, and marijuana through Canadian customs in 1980, so like, whatever.

I guess I’d rather have someone with a Hall of Fame vote err on the side of taking it a bit too seriously than to believe that it’s a joke or a goof. But come on. “Sacred responsibility?” “Clean and pure?” You know that you’re dealing with mission creep of the first order when that kind of rhetoric is being tossed around about baseball.

Video: Jake Arrieta hits a 465-foot home run off of Zack Greinke

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Jake Arrieta‘s bat is in midseason form already. The Cubs’ ace swatted a solo home run to center field off of Zack Greinke in Thursday afternoon’s Grapefruit League exhibition game, his first homer of the spring.

The blast went 465 feet, according to MLB.com’s Daren Willman.

Arrieta has hit two home runs in each of the past two seasons. Madison Bumgarner (eight) and Noah Syndergaard (four) are the only other pitchers to match or exceed his output in that department.

Greinke, meanwhile, is hoping to bounce back after a miserable 2016 season. He finished with an uncharacteristic 4.37 ERA in 26 starts in his first year with the Diamondbacks.

Luis Valbuena to miss four to six weeks with a strained right hamstring

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Angels first baseman Luis Valbuena will miss the next four to six weeks with a strained right hamstring, Pedro Moura of the Los Angeles Times reports.

Valbuena, 31, signed a two-year, $15 million contract with the Angels in January and was on track to get the lion’s share of the playing time at first base. While he’s out, however, C.J. Cron will handle first base on a regular basis. When Valbeuna returns, the two will likely form a platoon.

Last year with the Astros, Valbuena hit a solid .260/.357/.459 with 13 home runs and 40 RBI in 342 plate appearances.