Cashman told Pettitte “don’t Brett Favre us”

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I’ve chafed at the notion — increasingly repeated by some of you out there in Internet Land — that Andy Pettitte is “pulling a Brett Favre.”  He’s not. Favre retired and then un-retired and each time he did it he used his many, many friends in the football media to play the drama up to his maximal advantage.  Pettitte may be privately dithering, but he has gone home and he has stayed quiet and hasn’t been yanking anyone’s chain as far as I can tell.

Not that Brian Cashman hasn’t worried about him doing that a bit.  Here’s Cashman, speaking at a Chamber of Commerce breakfast today, as reported in the Trentonian:

“Andy has talking about being home for years. Being from Texas and having to be in New York for six months out of the year can be hard because he has kids and he’s missing important time with them. He’s opting not to play right now but that might change it might not. I told him don’t ‘Brett Favre’ us. You got to be all in and fully dedicated to play. Do I need him? I need him, but I don’t want him to play if his heart’s not in it.”

I know the Pettitte situation is unusual and that we all want some resolution to it one way or the other, but I think Cashman and Pettitte have handled it about as well as anyone could have handled this. No one has said anything dumb. To the extent anyone has said anything at all it has been to correct media reports that have overstated this or that.

I would have told Pettitte not to “Brett Favre” me too. And good for him for not doing so.

But any time you want to tell folks what you’re doing next season, Andy, that would be great. And remember: the “don’t Brett Favre us” rule probably applies to manner in which you tell Cashman what you’re doing too, not just the substance. So please: no texting.

(link via BTF)

Joe Maddon ejected in eighth inning of NLCS Game 4 after umpires overturn a Wade Davis strikeout

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Cubs manager Joe Maddon was once again ejected from an NLCS game, this time in Game 4.

In the top of the eighth inning, closer Wade Davis found himself in a bit of a pickle. He gave up a leadoff home run to Justin Turner, cutting the Cubs’ lead to 3-2. Davis then walked Yasiel Puig. He was able to get Andre Ethier to pop up, bringing up Curtis Granderson. Granderson worked the count 2-2, then fouled off a pitch. And then he appeared to swing through a curve that bounced in the dirt. Catcher Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out, but Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, so it was a foul ball.

Wolf conferred with the other umpires. After a brief delay, the strikeout was overturned and Granderson was given new life in the batter’s box. Only… replays showed that Wolf got it right the first time.

Understandably, Maddon was livid. On the broadcast, one could see Maddon gesturing to the umpires to look at the replay on the video board behind the stands in left field. The argument fell on deaf ears and he was ejected. Thankfully for the Cubs, justice prevailed and Davis struck out Granderson on the next pitch.

It’ll be interesting to see if Maddon makes any political comparisons after the game. He likened the slide rule, the impetus behind his Game 1 ejection, to the soda tax.